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Skip to 0 minutes and 1 secondOkay, so let's get started with a problem scenario, getting replacement parts for a job. Let's draft an epic story. >> Okay, that sounds good. So maybe we should start with, as Trent the technician, I want to get a replacement part. >> Okay, as Trent the tech

Skip to 0 minutes and 21 seconds>> I want to get a replacement part.

Skip to 0 minutes and 32 secondsWhat happens next, Danny? >> So that I can finished the job quickly?

Skip to 0 minutes and 37 seconds>> Quickly, I wouldn't necessarily use a term like that. I'm not going to code it, so it's times consuming for him >> That's a good point. So let's take a step back. Before he needs to get the replacement part, what happens? >> Well he needs to ID the part and then he needs to figure out how to get it. >> Okay, so maybe we should say something, like is Trent the technician, I want to identify the replacement part. >> Okay, To identify the replacement part.

Skip to 1 minute and 10 secondsWhat's the next clause? >> So that I can finish the job?

Skip to 1 minute and 16 seconds>> What happens before that? >> I guess you would have to talk to the customer. So maybe we say, as Trent the tech, I want to identify the replacement part, so that I can figure out the next steps for the customer. >> Okay, that sounds good.

Skip to 1 minute and 44 secondsThis definitely seems like something we get to prototyping. And we can flush out some chat stories after that. >> Sounds good.

Skit: Drafting Epics from Problem Scenarios

In this video, a skit is provided to help you understand how to draft epics from problem scenarios.

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This video is from the free online course:

Getting Started with Agile and Design Thinking

Darden School of Business, University of Virginia