• Wellcome Genome Campus Connecting Science Advanced courses and Scientific Conferences
New

Bacterial Genomes: Antimicrobial Resistance in Bacterial Pathogens

What's antimicrobial resistance and how can we detect it? Explore the clinical relevance of AMR and the methods used to detect it.

Bacterial Genomes: Antimicrobial Resistance in Bacterial Pathogens
  • Duration3 weeks
  • Weekly study5 hours
  • LearnFree
  • Digital upgradeFree

Explore the challenges of AMR and learn how experts work to address them

AMR is a public health emergency. Global projections predict the loss of nearly 10 million lives and up to $100 trillion lost in global production by 2050. According to the United Nations and the WHO, AMR requires immediate international action.

On this course, you will explore the historical and epidemiological aspects of antibiotics and AMR, and recognise its clinical significance.

You will explore the role of genomics in tackling AMR from research, diagnostic and surveillance perspectives, as well as the principles and practice of AMR Quality Assurance.

Download video: standard or HD

Skip to 0 minutes and 8 secondsResistance to antibiotics is one of the most pressing issues in global health today. This exciting new online course, Antimicrobial Resistance and Bacterial Pathogens, is about the laboratory techniques used to detect and study antimicrobial resistance and the new horizons opened up by the application of genomic techniques. I'm Fahad Khokhar. And I'm Beth Blane. We're researchers at the University of Cambridge. In this course, you'll be learning about some of the mechanisms of bacterial resistance to antibiotics and some techniques used to identify resistant strains, and molecular methods with bioinformatic tools to analyse genomic data.

Skip to 0 minutes and 45 secondsYou'll also hear from leaders in the field of AMR research to gain an insight into how they are using these techniques and tools, as well as potential issues they might be facing as we continue to combat this global threat. If you are a health care professional or scientist working in AMR or anyone with an interest in this urgent problem, then this course is for you. You will learn about the most effective techniques available and the impact of genomics. You'll also hear from people all over the world working in the field.

Skip to 1 minute and 12 secondsWe hope you'll be able to join us over the next few weeks and to take part in discussions about AMR and how to solve some of the problems it causes for health care around the world.

Syllabus

  • Week 1

    From 30 Mar 2020

    Introduction to Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR)

    • Welcome to the course

      Learning together

    • Welcome to Week 1

      Course objectives and meet the educators

    • Introduction

      Introduction to antibiotics

    • What is the problem?

      Why is AMR a problem?

    • Mechanisms of resistance

      Mechanisms of AMR

    • Evolution and transfer

      Evolution and transfer

    • End of Week 1

      End of the week quiz, discussion and summary

  • Week 2

    From 6 Apr 2020

    Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing

    • Welcome to Week 2

      Welcome to Week 2 video

    • Overview

      Introduction to the lab health and safety, aseptic techniques and quality control

    • Bacterial Identification

      Techniques for bacterial identification and importance of correct results

    • Antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST)

      AST - laboratory procedures explained

    • Advanced approaches to AST

      Molecular approaches to AST

    • Advanced Molecular Techniques

      Advanced molecular and sequencing technologies

    • End of Week 2

      End of Week 2 quiz, discussion and summary

  • Week 3

    From 13 Apr 2020

    Genomic Surveillance of AMR

    • Welcome to Week 3

      Welcome video for Week 3

    • Genotype to Phenotype

      ENA database and assembly, and use of Pathogenwatch to upload/analyse genomes

    • Mobile Genetic Elements

      Genome analysis using Artemis and ACT

    • Transmission and Evolution

      Fine scale evolutionary history – history, geography, transmission pathways, movement and acquisition of resistance

    • The Future

      Proactive strategies for tackling AMR in the future

    • End of Week 3

      End of Week 3 discussion and summary

    • Course assessment

      End of the course assessment

    • Concluding discussion, reflection and acknowledgments

      Conclusion, reflection with next steps, and acknowledgments to course developers

When would you like to start?

Most FutureLearn courses run multiple times. Every run of a course has a set start date but you can join it and work through it after it starts. Find out more

  • Available now

What will you achieve?

By the end of the course, you'll be able to...

  • Describe the clinical significance and challenges of AMR
  • Describe molecular approaches and techniques for the detection and characterisation of AMR genes
  • Identify the resistance profile of bacterial pathogens
  • Explain the principles and practice of Quality Assurance and Quality Control in AMR surveillance techniques, antimicrobial susceptibility testing and reporting
  • Explore the role of genomics in tackling AMR from a research, diagnostics and surveillance point of view

Who is the course for?

This course is designed for researchers and healthcare professionals interested in infectious diseases, epidemics and the problem of microbial resistance. It will help those with backgrounds in microbiology or bioinformatics to work together.

No prior learning is required, but it is recommended learners with no previous knowledge of AMR take the introductory FutureLearn course, Bacterial Genomes: Disease Outbreaks and AMR.

What software or tools do you need?

No previously installed software is required. You may be required to access websites to use bioinformatics tools.

What do people say about this course?

I look at tackling antimicrobial resistance as saving humankind

Professor Sam Kariuki, Director of the Centre for Microbiology Research at KEMRI, Kenya.

Who will you learn with?

Beth Blane

Beth Blane

I am a research assistant in the Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, and a Health and Care Professions Council registered Biomedical Scientist.

Ewan  Harrison

Ewan Harrison

I am a microbiologist based at the Wellcome Sanger Institue and the University of Cambridge in the UK. My research focuses on bacterial pathogens and antibiotic resistance.

Francesc Coll

Francesc Coll

I am a computational biologist with expertise in bacterial genomics and clinical microbiology. I have taught in multiple short courses on microbial genomics and antimicrobial resistance.

Narender Kumar

Narender Kumar

I am a bioinformatician at the University of Cambridge, UK. I work on detection of drug resistance from the whole genome sequences of bacterial pathogens.

Fahad Khokhar

Fahad Khokhar

I am a Research Assistant in the Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge. My research focusses on the diagnostics of bacterial pathogens and AMR genes.

Who developed the course?

Wellcome Genome Campus Advanced Courses and Scientific Conferences

Wellcome Genome Campus Advanced Courses and Scientific Conferences provides open postgraduate courses and conferences focused on biomedicine.

Learner reviews

What's included?

Wellcome Genome Campus Advanced Courses and Scientific Conferences are offering everyone who joins this course a free digital upgrade, so that you can experience the full benefits of studying online for free. This means that you get:

  • Unlimited access to this course
  • Includes any articles, videos, peer reviews and quizzes
  • Tests to validate your learning
  • A PDF Certificate of Achievement to prove your success when you’re eligible