Anti-Jewish measures

  1. For an overview of the Anti-Jewish policies enacted by the Nazis read the Yad Vashem article accessible via the link at the bottom of the page.

  2. Consider the below excerpts of the original documents produced by the Nazis:

Boycot Day:

From : Documents on the Holocaust, Selected Sources on the Destruction of the Jews of Germany and Austria, Poland and the Soviet Union, Yad Vashem, Jerusalem, 1981, Document no. 7

Organization of the Anti-Jewish Boycott of April 1, 1933 – Instructions Given by the National-Socialist Party

Point 9: Mass [meetings] to Demand the Numerus Clausus! The Action Committees will immediately organize tens of thousands of mass meetings, reaching down to the smallest village, at which the demand will be raised for the introduction of a limited quota for the employment of Jews in all professions, according to their proportion in the German population. In order to increase the impact of this step the demand should be limited to three areas for the time being: a) attendance at German high schools and universities; b) the medical profession; c) the legal profession.

Nuremberg Laws:

Law for the Protection of German Blood and German Honor of September 15, 1935: Moved by the understanding that purity of German blood is the essential condition for the continued existence of the German people, and inspired by the inflexible determination to ensure the existence of the German nation for all time, the Reichstag has unanimously adopted the following law, which is promulgated herewith:

Article 1: Marriages between Jews and subjects of the state of German or related blood are forbidden. Marriages nevertheless concluded are invalid, even if concluded abroad to circumvent this law.

Article 2: Extramarital relations between Jews and subjects of the state of German or related blood are forbidden.

Article 3: Jews may not employ in their households female subjects of the state of German or related blood who are under 45 years old.

Article 4: Jews are forbidden to fly the Reich or national flag or display Reich colors. They are, on the other hand, permitted to display the Jewish colors. The exercise of this right is protected by the state.

Article 5:

  • Any person who violates the prohibition under Article 1 will be punished with a prison sentence.

  • A male who violates the prohibition under Article 2 will be punished with a jail term or a prison sentence.

  • Any person violating the provisions under Articles 3 or 4 will be punished with a jail term of up to one year and a fine, or with one or the other of these penalties.

Article 6: The Reich Minister of the Interior, in coordination with the Deputy of the Führer and the Reich Minister of Justice, will issue the legal and administrative regulations required to implement and complete this law.

Article 7: The law takes effect on the day following promulgation, except for Article 3, which goes into force on January 1, 1936. Nuremberg, September 15, 1935 At the Reich Party Congress of Freedom

The Führer and Reich Chancellor [signed] Adolf Hitler The Reich Minster of the Interior [signed] Frick The Reich Minister of Justice [signed] Dr. Gürtner The Deputy of the Führer [signed] R. Hes

Changing of names to Israel and Sara:

Y. Arad, Y. Gutman, A. Margaliot (editors), Documents on the Holocaust, Selected Sources on the Destruction of the Jews of Germany and Austria, Poland, and the Soviet Union, Yad Vashem, Jerusalem, 1981, pp. 98-99.

Second Regulation for the Implementation of the Law Regarding the Changing of Family Names and Given Names, August 17, 1938

Insofar as Jews have given names other than those which they are permitted to bear according to §1,i they are required as from January 1, 1939, to take an additional given name; males will take the given name Israel, females the given name Sara….

Berlin, August 17, 1938 The Reich Minister of the Interior Signed for Dr. Stuckart The Reich Minister of Justice Dr. Guertner Reichsgesetzblatt, I, 1938, p. 1044.

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Antisemitism: From Its Origins to the Present

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