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Skip to 0 minutes and 5 secondsIn this video case study from Sussex Downs College, you can see how teachers have shared and reused teaching materials. Sociology lecturer, Steve Bassett, talks about how he changed his practice after watching a YouTube video. He sought support from a learning technology expert and then created a range of flipped learning materials using simple apps on his mobile device, such as Explain Everything. Steve's ideas have been adopted by other teachers within his college as a result of his enthusiasm and success with his learners. In course one, we looked at open educational resources and discussed the value of being able to search for, download, and use teaching materials through the use of Creative Commons licences.

Skip to 0 minutes and 52 secondsMany participants found websites such as Jorum, Khan Academy, Merlot, The Excellence Gateway and OpenLearn very useful for finding individual learning objects. However, the challenge remains for VET practitioners who are short of time to source and share ready-made learning resources in the form of lesson plans and learning activities appropriate for their learners' needs and qualification level. This is an ongoing and recognised issue throughout the education sector. In this activity, we will discuss some ways that we can all use sharing to improve this situation.

Skip to 1 minute and 35 secondsSo what we're going to do, first of all, in today's session before we build upon your screencast notes is, we're going to do a quiz using Kahootz. And this quiz will be based upon all of the stuff that you've previously learned on the theoretical perspectives from the screencast. The light bulb moment for me was when John Webber, who was sort of in charge of staff development at the time showed me a YouTube video that a PE teacher at our Lewes campus had made where he had decided to deliver some of the direct instruction through a little video that the students have to watch before they came to the session.

Skip to 2 minutes and 13 secondsWe're looking at the actual process of carbohydrate loading before a competition. Steve thought that's an interesting process. I could do something like that for my students. And he contacted me and said, look, I'm going to give this a shot. And so we worked together. I thought, well, why don't I create some revision screencasts and videos where I reminded the students that the key kind of knowledge that they needed for each topic. --x-ray picture that the fish that we started with-- So I use an app called Explain Everything.

Skip to 2 minutes and 49 secondsAnd the thing to put me off about making the screencast is I just thought it was going to be a ridiculous amount of work and I was really impressed kind of how easy it was really to take existing presentations, just kind of PowerPoint presentations, and very simply record your voice over the top of it, add annotations, play around with the presentation a bit. So in the previous screencast, we looked to the first section. My vision as it evolved was to create a digital version of me and from making these videos, it was giving the students the opportunity to pause, rewind their teacher, listen to explanations more than once.

Skip to 3 minutes and 33 secondsSteve's colleagues know him as somebody who's always got a really refreshing, new idea. The flipped learning approach has inspired me for my subject-- I teach French-- to record a screencast before the lesson and show it to students in advance of the lesson enables students to prepare themselves before the lesson. Steve said if you have any questions, come and ask me and our innovations team said if you need help with the nuts and bolts, come and speak to us. I designed a session based on planning a series of lessons. I created the screencast. So when they arrived at the class, they were ready and it was just a revelation.

Skip to 4 minutes and 17 secondsIt's about actually looking for opportunities to use materials that are already in existence rather than recreating stuff, which is a laborious process. For example, Steve, who has shared his ideas about flipped learning, all of this is now on iTeach and iTeach is a section within iLearn, which is our Moodle. It's a place for shared resources within our college for other people to access. They can go on iTeach and watch a screencast of Steve talking about flipped learning and what it is about. OK. This short screencast is designed for either AS or A2 sociology students.

Skip to 5 minutes and 5 secondsI'm very active on things like Twitter and I've always felt with technology, that if you're very kind of open about things and share things then people are very generous and they reciprocate and you get a conversation going and people will give you useful kind of feedback and they will critique them and they will help you improve them. I hold to the view that we can inspire the confidence and trust of teachers in new ideas if they hear from other colleagues and see examples from other colleagues that they trust and respect. You'll be assigned a screencast. We delivered a workshop to a conference organised by the learning consortium on flipped learning and screencasting.

Skip to 5 minutes and 51 secondsWhat it shows really is as a team at the college, we really want to spread this idea as much as possible. It's both sharing ideas and techniques and it's reusing resources that are already available.

Sharing and re-using teaching ideas

In this step, you can watch a video case study from Sussex Downs College about how teachers have shared and re-used teaching materials. We also outline some ways in which you might be able to share your materials and ideas with other practitioners, outside of this course.

In the video case study, sociology lecturer Steve Bassett talks about how he changed his practice after watching a YouTube video. He sought support from a learning technology expert, and then created a range of flipped learning materials using simple apps on his mobile device (e.g. Explain Everything). Steve’s ideas have been adopted by other teachers within his college, as a result of his enthusiasm and success with his learners.

In Blended Learning Essentials: Getting Started, we looked at Open Educational Resources and discussed the value of being able to search for, download and use teaching materials through the use of Creative Commons licences. Many participants found websites such as Jorum, Khan Academy, TES, MERLOT, the excellence gateway and OpenLearn very useful for finding individual learning objects.

However, the challenge remains for VET practitioners who are short of time to source and share ready-made learning resources in the form of lesson plans and learning activities appropriate for their learners’ needs and qualification level. This is an on-going and recognised issue throughout the education sector. There are a number of ways for you to contribute to improving sharing of teaching materials:

  • Post resources you have created in OER repositories or on a public blog, making good use of tags and metadata to aid retrieval;
  • Encourage communities of practice within, and beyond your work-place e.g. regional communities sharing materials using tools such as Google or Dropbox.
  • Contribute to regional CPD events, such as Teachmeets. See for example, the CILIP Information Literacy Group and the Tinder Foundation who are hosting TeachMeet events on digital literacies.
  • Contribute to national initiatives, such as the STEM Exchange which is part of the wider STEM Alliance project established by Semta and commissioned and funded by the Education and Training Foundation (ETF). The STEM Exchange provides opportunities for VET practitioners to share resources and to link up with professional organisations.

Have your say

  • What do you think of the ideas in the video case study?
  • Do they resonate with your practice and context?
  • How might you share your materials and practice with other practitioners after this course has finished?

This video is from the free online course:

Blended Learning Essentials: Embedding Practice

University of Leeds