Skip to 0 minutes and 10 secondsHello. Ms. Zhu, I always say nǐhǎo to greet people. Is that right? Well, nǐhǎo sounds better. ao is what we call a compound final. We've already learned six simple finals in Pinyin. And in this video, we will learn some compound finals composed of them which start with a,o,e.

Skip to 0 minutes and 41 secondsHere's the first one. George, would you like to try? Sure. "a-i". "ai." "a" plus "i" is not correct.

Skip to 0 minutes and 55 secondsDon't simply pronounce one final after another. There should be a gradual transition from the first final "a" into the second final "i". For example, ài means love, wǒ ài nǐ I love you. Let's put "ai" after an initial to make a syllable. m-ai, mǎi.

Skip to 1 minute and 26 seconds"ao" the same way. Open your mouth widely and then gradually transition into "o", ao.

Skip to 1 minute and 37 secondsFor example, m-ao, māo.

Skip to 1 minute and 44 seconds"an" "n" here is just a nasal sound.

Skip to 1 minute and 53 secondsYour tongue should touch the upper gum until you finish the pronunciation.

Skip to 2 minutes and 0 seconds"a-ne(an)" is not correct. "an." For example, n-an, nán.

Skip to 2 minutes and 12 secondsang, the "ang" sound is made in the back of your mouth. Open your mouth to form a bigger space at the back and retract your tongue, "ang." For example, p-anɡ, pànɡ.

Skip to 2 minutes and 31 secondsNow let's practice more finals.

Skip to 2 minutes and 36 secondsou, onɡ, ei, en, enɡ.

Skip to 2 minutes and 47 secondsOK, now let's practice some syllables. h ai, hǎi; f anɡ, fánɡ; ɡ ou, ɡǒu.

Skip to 3 minutes and 1 secondYou can also find when we pronounce ai ei ao ou the first vowel sounds louder and longer. We refer to this as the main vowel.

Skip to 3 minutes and 15 secondsWhen a syllable has two or more vowels, the tongue should be marked on the main vowel. For example, "ai." The tongue should be marked "a". George, have you got it? That's quite complicated. Don't worry. Practice makes perfect. How about reading these syllabus after me? OK, I'll try my best.

Skip to 3 minutes and 44 secondsl-ao, lǎo lǎo k-an, kàn kàn l-onɡ, lónɡ lónɡ f-ei, fēi fēi Every syllable we practiced before has its own meaning. But in modern Chinese, words normally consist of two syllables. Let's practice some.

Skip to 4 minutes and 14 secondsdànɡāo dànɡāo mǐfàn mǐfàn Great. You're progressing well. Now use what you learned to practice more. Thanks. I will. See you. See you.

Finals Ⅱ

After learning six simple finals in Pinyin, we will learn some compound finals composed of them, which start with: ɑ,o,e. When you pronounce a compound final, don’t simply pronounce one final after another. Take “ai” for example, there should be a gradual transition from the first final ɑ into the second final ‘i .

ɑo, the same way, open your mouth widely, and then gradually transition into o. ɑn, here n is just a nasal sound, your tongue should touch the upper gum until you finish the pronunciation. ɑnɡ, the sounds is made in the back of your mouth. Open your mouth to form a bigger space at the back, and retract your tongue.

Syllables contain these finals:

  • mǎi — to buy
  • māo — cat
  • nán — male
  • pànɡ — fat

Using the method we’ve been talking before, you may try to read compound finals **ou、onɡ、ei、en、enɡ **.

We can also find that when we pronounce ɑi ei ɑo ou, the first vowel sounds louder and longer. We refer to this as the ‘main vowel’. When a syllable has two or more vowels, the tone should be marked on the main vowel. For example, ai, the tone should be marked on ɑ. In modern Chinese, words usually are consisted of two syllables, for example,

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Introduction to Chinese: Pronunciation and Tone

Shanghai International Studies University (SISU)

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