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Be Aware of Your Mood

Please take a look at the following reading, “Your Mood Affects Their Mood,” for more details about why understanding your own mood is so important for creating moments of joy. A downloadable and book-formatted version of the text is also available at the bottom of the page if you prefer reading it in that format.

Your Mood Affects Their Mood

You’d better believe it! Your mood absolutely affects their mood! If you’re rushed, they’re rushed. If you’re upset, they’re upset. If you’re happy, they’re more likely to be happy. What is your mood? Because, basically, you decide what kind of day you’re going to get.

When I knew nothing about Alzheimer’s, I would be all bubbly and hyper, talking loudly and fast. I felt like the faster I moved, the more I would get done. It didn’t work. People were bouncing off the walls. Luckily, I couldn’t keep up that pace, and in my tiredness I said, “I need to take a break. Relax, I’ll be back in twenty minutes.” I was ready to quit my job; I was exhausted. But when I returned almost everyone was still relaxed. Amazing! When my mood calmed down and I slowed down, so did they. —Jolene

Families think they are interviewing me, but I am actually interviewing them through the person with Alzheimer’s. I will not care for someone who is mean and nasty because that tells me the family is most likely mean and nasty. I can care for the person with Alzheimer’s when they are difficult but not the family. My lady was upset all the time because her family always wanted something from her. —Sister Richard

Check your body language. Check your facial expressions. Check your mood. What are they saying? You’re human, and there are days you will be crabby. Before you enter the room think of something you love: flowers, a grandchild, a pet, a friend. Now embody that feeling.

A good mood is like a balloon…one little prick is all it takes to ruin it! —Minions

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This article is from the free online course:

Creating Moments of Joy for People with Alzheimer’s

Purdue University

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