Skip to 0 minutes and 5 secondsIn this chapter, we will focus on the value of experiences that occur in a certain moment in time. We will consider how these moments connect us to the lived experiences of people with dementia, and we will also look at how they guide research by helping us to understand the psychological and physiological aspects of these experiences for the purposes of improving care, well-being, and engagement. To address these points, we will explore questions like, what are the characteristics of moments? Why do arts-based practices and activities lend themselves so well to in-the-moment experiences, in particular for people living with a dementia? Why should we invest in providing in-the-moment experiences within care services and settings?

Skip to 0 minutes and 53 secondsAnd, what can cultural institutions as well as researchers and policymakers do to provide further insight into the value of in-the-moment experiences?

Welcome to Week 2

Professor Paul Camic (Professor of Psychology & Public Health at Canterbury Christ Church University) provides an overview of the week’s content, introducing this week’s key concepts and questions. This includes:

  • What does it mean to be in the moment and what are its characteristics?
  • How do moments connect us to the lived experiences of people living with dementia?
  • How are moments helping to guide research to understand psychological and physiological aspects of experiences?
  • Why do arts-based practices lend themselves so well to in-the-moment experiences?
  • Why should we invest in providing in-the-moment experiences in care services and settings?
  • What can cultural institutions, researchers and policy makers do to provide further insights into the value of in-the-moment experiences?
The background music to this Welcome to Week 2 video comes from Hannah Peel’s instrumental version of ‘Tenderly’, taken from her album Awake But Always Dreaming, which was written as a way of addressing, exploring and coming to terms with her grandmother’s dementia. About this piece of music, Hannah says: ‘I spend a lot of time driving late at night after shows and rehearsals, often on my own through traffic, in and out of cities, and London in particular. There is a lot more time for me to reflect at night and to see what is happening all around. Many ideas and inspiration comes from those journeys and it’s always quite surreal to imagine in every darkened room passed, people are sleeping, in a different world, whilst life drives by them. Samples of traffic recordings and lush string lines give the dreamy and melancholy sense of past and present tense.’
CREDITS We would like to extend a special thank you to the following individuals and organisations for providing supplementary footage and images for this video: * James Berry/ Wigmore Hall * Dance for Life Mini-Documentary/ Matthew Bourne’s New Adventures & Re:Bourne and Dementia Pathfinders.

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This video is from the free online course:

Dementia and the Arts: Sharing Practice, Developing Understanding and Enhancing Lives

UCL (University College London)