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Skip to 0 minutes and 10 secondsNICK BAKER: Hello, and welcome to Week 2. The last week we focused on defining creativity in football, the role of the coach in the creative process, and asking coaches to adopt a player-centered approach by seeing learning through the eyes of their players. This week we're going to focus on applying some of these ideas to our practises. In recent years, English footballers have been challenged to be more creative and play with more flair and individual expression in response to what has been seen as a lack of creativity when compared with players from larger European countries and Latin America.

Skip to 0 minutes and 40 secondsIn order to develop more creative players, it is natural for coaches to also need to be more creative in their approach to developing players and for them to create an environment that allows for freedom of expression and creativity to flourish. The FA Vision for Players is "to inspire, empower and support generations of technically excellent, creative players who make effective decisions and can demonstrate pride and integrity in everything they do." If we truly want to do this, we must consider how to design our practises to ensure players are constantly making decisions to solve game-related problems and produce imaginative, original and ultimately creative solutions.

Skip to 1 minute and 19 secondsHistorically, football coaching in England has often been coach led in nature, with a heavy reliance on the coaches being the expert and the central figure of power in the coach-player relationship. However, if we want to develop creative players in the future, is this correct? Does the coach have all the answers? And is the coach's role to solely provide all the answers to the players? Do you design practises that enable players to be creative? Do you allow them to be innovative and solve problems in game-related environments? This week, we'll address these questions by considering how they influence practise. First of all, we'll consider practise design and introduce coaching fundamentals that are central to any practise delivered.

Skip to 2 minutes and 0 secondsSecond, we'll watch two England National coaches deliver practises which promote creativity. And finally, we'll look at modifications of the game, such as futsal, in promoting creative play. So as with other weeks, there are interactive tasks for you to apply in your sessions and also opportunities for you to interact with each other. We hope you enjoy this week. And the learning outcomes for you are on the following part of this video.

Welcome to Week 2

Last week we focused on defining creativity in football, the role of the coach in the creative process, and asking coaches to adopt a player focused approach by seeing learning through the eyes of their players.

This week, we’re going to focus on applying some of these ideas to our practices.

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This video is from the free online course:

Youth Football Coaching: Developing Creative Players

University of Birmingham