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Skip to 0 minutes and 9 secondsSPEAKER 1: In developing creative players, there is a need to empower young players. By empowerment we mean to give them the skills and knowledge to succeed, to feel valued, and to develop a sense of purpose and confidence in their own ability. In the following videos from Dr. Carla Luguetti from Santa Cecilia University, Santos, Brazil, talks about her research on empowering young children in sport.

Skip to 0 minutes and 31 secondsCARLA LUGUETTI: My name is Carla Luguetti, and I am Santa Cecilia University of Brazil. I am a researcher in spore pedagogy area, and I have been studying the importance of giving players ownership in order to empower them. When we ask coaches about how they develop creativity in young players, they'd describe [INAUDIBLE] sided games, problem-solving, and other ideas. However, by giving players voice, we also develop creativity and empowerment. In my line of research, we work in socially vulnerable areas, poor areas. And through football, we help young players to name the problems they face, critique, and transform or negotiate those barriers. For example, avoiding a life of crime was the main problem young people, young players, faced in my last research.

Skip to 1 minute and 32 secondsBy listening and responding to young players, we developed a leadership programme where they learn life skills. In that sense, creativity is also related to listen and respond to young people's voice. If you think about football, Brazil is considered the home of creativity. Neymar, [INAUDIBLE], [? Hivaldu, ?] to [? Hamada, ?] Pele, and many others. And how do we develop creativity in young players?

Skip to 2 minutes and 8 secondsSPEAKER 3: So what we are going to do now is a typical game that they bring from their culture in order for us to practise. Every very famous or every celebrity soccer player, they usually explain that those games they play when they're children are very important in their career. So we try to take advantage of those cultural games as much as much as possible. What we are going to do now, we're going to playing defence versus attack, in which the goals they score have different points or different values according to the aim they have. So if they kick the ball and the goalkeeper defends it, but the ball rebounds and the attack scores, it's one point.

Skip to 2 minutes and 54 secondsIf the ball hits the post, it's five points. If the ball hits the high post, it's 10 points. So this is called [? hibachi ?] in Portuguese.

Skip to 3 minutes and 2 secondsSPEAKER 1: Evidence suggests that giving players opportunities to design their own games or their own practises can effectively enhance both game knowledge and social learning. Asking them to focus on specific components of game play such as skills and strategy can empower them towards a deeper understanding of these components. While we are often guided by performance, player design games are central to promoting active, social, and creative environments while empowering individuals towards sustained engagement.

Empowering young players

In developing creative players, there is a need to empower young players.

By empowerment, we mean to give them the skills and knowledge to succeed, to feel valued and develop a sense of purpose and confidence in their own ability.

In this video, Dr Carla Luguetti from Santa Cecília University, Santos discusses her research which focusses on the importance of empowering players for sustained engagement.

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This video is from the free online course:

Youth Football Coaching: Developing Creative Players

University of Birmingham