Contact FutureLearn for Support
Skip main navigation
We use cookies to give you a better experience, if that’s ok you can close this message and carry on browsing. For more info read our cookies policy.
We use cookies to give you a better experience. Carry on browsing if you're happy with this, or read our cookies policy for more information.

Skip to 0 minutes and 1 secondDANIEL POELL: Hello and welcome. My name is Daniel Poell and today, I would like to demonstrate to you how I can as a blind person surf the web using a screen reader. I'm currently on the AAATE site and I'll just begin to scroll down. Now, I'm at the logo. If you follow the red square on the screen, you can always see where I am at the moment. I can read the web only line per line. Now, I'm at the User menu-- Become a Member, Member Login, Imprint. Now, I get to the main menu, About AAATE, Become a Member, Honourable Members-- this sounds interesting so I press Enter to open that link.

Skip to 0 minutes and 47 secondsWith the H key, I can jump to the next headlines, enabling me to skip all the menus that I have already seen. Now, I can start reading to read here again-- image of a diamond, "technology in Europe," "honourable membership is granted by," and so on.

Skip to 1 minute and 15 secondsThanks for your attention.

Web content accessibility

In the video you see Daniel Pöll describing how he navigates a web page using a screen reader, with the various elements being highlighted as he goes through using his keyboard to select each item and explores the accessible content.

The elements in an HTML document, that make up a web page, are grouped in a tree like structure, called the Document Object Model (DOM) of the page.

The diagram provides an example of a simplified HTML DOM of a web page.

A simplified HTML DOM of a web page

© This image is created by Johannes Kepler Universität Linz and licensed under CC-BY BY 4.0 International Licence. Erasmus + MOOCs for Accessibility Partnership.

It is important that the HTML document has a title and a body containing the content of the webpage. The content starts with a heading followed by a paragraph and an image that has an alternative text tag.

A blind person, using a screen reader, can use this structure to navigate from one element to the next and when there are more than one heading jump to each one as mentioned by Daniel.


© This video is created by Johannes Kepler Universität Linz and licensed under CC-BY BY 4.0 International Licence. Erasmus + MOOCs for Accessibility Partnership.

© This text is a derivative of a work created by Johannes Kepler Universität Linz, and licensed under CC-BY BY 4.0 International Licence adapted and used by the University of Southampton. Erasmus + MOOCs for Accessibility Partnership.

Share this video:

This video is from the free online course:

Digital Accessibility: Enabling Participation in the Information Society

University of Southampton