Course educators, Dr Scott Spurlock, Dr Neil McIntyre, Dr Lionel Glassey
Left: Dr Scott Spurlock, Top right: Dr Neil McIntyre, Bottom right: Dr Lionel Glassey

Meet the team

This course is brought to you by experts at the University of Glasgow.

They will introduce you to early modern Scottish history, the Church of Scotland, the extant records and the skills needed to read them.

Dr Scott Spurlock
Scott is Senior Lecturer in Scottish Religious Cultures. He specialises in Scottish religion, historical theology, religious networks and early modern colonialism. He has published widely on early modern Scotland and is regularly engaged with early modern Scottish documents.
See Scott’s profile here
Find out more about Scott’s interests on the University of Glasgow website

Dr Neil McIntyre
Neil is Lecturer in Scottish History. His work focuses on the intellectual history of early modern Scotland. He has recently published on Presbyterian conventicles, the political thought of James Stewart of Goodtrees, and memories of the Covenanting revolution. See Neil’s profile here
Find out more about Neil’s interests at Academia.edu

Dr Lionel Glassey
Lionel is an Honorary Senior Research Fellow in History. He is best known for his research on the Restoration and Revolution periods in Britain. He has spent over four decades in the archives and is currently working on a critical edition of Gilbert Burnet’s History of My Own Time.
Find out more about Lionel’s interests on the University of Glasgow website

Jamie Kelly
Jamie is a doctoral researcher at the University of Glasgow. He is studying the operation and impact of the Society in Scotland for Propagating Christian Knowledge (SSPCK), an eighteenth century charity school organisation dedicated to evangelising and educating children in the Highlands of Scotland.
See Jamie’s profile here
Find out more about Jamie’s interests on the University of Glasgow website

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This article is from the free online course:

Early Modern Scottish Palaeography: Reading Scotland's Records

University of Glasgow