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This content is taken from the University of Leeds & Institute of Coding's online course, Essential Skills for Your Career Development. Join the course to learn more.

Write your value proposition

It’s now time to write your own value proposition.

The first step is to consider the statement you created using your vision board, in which you defined your curiosity and vision at that point in time. This is the starting point from which you’re going to pursue your career. You’ll use it to create a value proposition that is in line with your vision statement.

Next, ask yourself the following questions:

  • How is my character and personality distinct, unique and of value to an employer, or to what I’m trying to pursue?
  • How is my skill set unique, distinct and transferable?
  • How would it be of value to an employer or to what I’m trying to pursue?
  • How are my vision and my goals in life distinct and unique to whoever hires me, or to what I’m pursuing?

Using these questions, you’re going to create your value proposition. It will follow a simple format:

“Hi, my name is [blank] and right now my goal is to do [blank]. My [insert attributes] offer [insert value], my skills set offers [insert value]. My goals and intentions will support [insert company] in doing better at [insert detail].”

How you then deliver this, what language you choose to express yourself, and how you convey your thoughts will be distinct to you as an individual. However, the statement itself needs to be crisp and concise.

For example:

“My name is […]. My goal is to be a software programmer. My ability to code and understand programme languages enables me to to produce sophisticated apps and create new features for operating external machinery. My goals and intentions will support your company to improve its existing code and to have the best computer software in the world.”

Presenting your value proposition

Once you’re happy with your value proposition, you can choose to present it using one of the following options:

  • Record only your voice as you tell your presentation story using SpeakPipe* and share the link here in the Comments section. SpeakPipe allows you to record for up to five minutes and, once saved, recordings are available for three months and can be shared via a URL generated upon save.

  • Film yourself presenting your story and upload it to Vimeo or YouTube. You can then share the link here in the Comments section.

  • Present your story to a friend or family member and ask for their constructive feedback if you don’t want to record yourself.

You can also browse other learners’ presentations and give them some constructive feedback. Remember to identify something they did well and advise on something that they can work on for next time.

To help you prepare, you might also take a look at the Presenting your Work with Impact course. In this course, you’ll explore the connection between content and delivery. You’ll learn how to engage a group of people and how to use the power of face-to-face communication in order to communicate with impact.

*SpeakPipe works with the latest versions of Chrome and Firefox on Android devices. iOS devices don’t support recording audio in a browser, so you need the SpeakPipe iOS app in order to record voice messages. Recordings are stored by a third-party service.

Summary

Many people who start out in their career get locked into things they don’t want to do because they’re fearful of expressing what they want. That’s not of service to anyone, and won’t show your true value to an organisation. A good organisation is not going to be threatened by you having intentions and goals. Instead, they’re going to want to support you in achieving them.

Getting comfortable with expressing yourself is the key part of the value proposition. You want to be able to say, “I will serve the organisation’s goals in my distinct and unique way.” This doesn’t mean you’re locked into that. We all evolve, but your value proposition shows that you have a vision for your career and that you feel that this particular organisation will serve that.

Remember to avoid vague statements about your abilities and interests. Instead, make a concise and clear statement. You’re taking the time to think through how you offer value, how this is in line with your goals and your vision, and how you can communicate that to someone clearly.

You can find out more about strengthening your communication skills in the Communication and Interpersonal skills at Work course.

Share your experience:

Did you find it easier to put together your value proposition using the statement from your vision board? Share and discuss your responses with other learners in the Comments section.

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This article is from the free online course:

Essential Skills for Your Career Development

University of Leeds