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Skip to 0 minutes and 6 seconds Year 11 (age 15-16) Science: the heart and double circulation

Skip to 0 minutes and 10 seconds TEACHER: Is there any key language you can use around this?

Skip to 0 minutes and 15 seconds STUDENT: Like deoxygenated, oxygenated blood.

Skip to 0 minutes and 17 seconds TEACHER: What’s the difference between them?

Skip to 0 minutes and 19 seconds STUDENT: Oxygenated blood carries oxygen. Deoxygenated blood carries carbon dioxide.

Skip to 0 minutes and 24 seconds TEACHER: OK, and when you say oxygenated, when you say it’s carrying oxygen when it’s oxygenated, what do you mean it’s carrying oxygen?

Skip to 0 minutes and 30 seconds STUDENT: It’s carrying oxygen to muscles.

Skip to 0 minutes and 34 seconds TEACHER: OK, and how does it do that?

Skip to 0 minutes and 37 seconds STUDENT: I don’t know.

Skip to 0 minutes and 38 seconds TEACHER: How does the blood carry oxygen?

Skip to 0 minutes and 40 seconds STUDENT: In its’ cells.

Skip to 0 minutes and 41 seconds TEACHER: OK, which cells? Come on, Jay.

Skip to 0 minutes and 43 seconds STUDENT: Red blood cells.

Skip to 0 minutes and 44 seconds TEACHER: There we go.

Skip to 0 minutes and 47 seconds TEACHER: What did you think?

Skip to 0 minutes and 49 seconds Year 9 (age 13-14) Science: chemical bonding

Skip to 0 minutes and 52 seconds TEACHER: On this one, What happened to the two charges?

Skip to 0 minutes and 55 seconds STUDENT: [INAUDIBLE].

Skip to 0 minutes and 56 seconds TEACHER: OK, on this one, what happens?

Skip to 0 minutes and 58 seconds STUDENT: [INAUDIBLE].

Skip to 0 minutes and 59 seconds TEACHER: So what does it need to get to balance the two charges?

Skip to 1 minute and 2 seconds STUDENT: Stick in another.

Skip to 1 minute and 4 seconds TEACHER: Stick in another what?

Skip to 1 minute and 6 seconds STUDENT: Two.

Skip to 1 minute and 7 seconds TEACHER: Well, I’ve got two plus and minus one. So how can I get to zero?

Skip to 1 minute and 11 seconds STUDENT: Add another.

Skip to 1 minute and 12 seconds TEACHER: Add another–

Skip to 1 minute and 13 seconds STUDENT: Three, Two.

Skip to 1 minute and 14 seconds TEACHER: So I’ve go on do it plus, plus, minus–

Skip to 1 minute and 18 seconds STUDENT: You [INAUDIBLE] the minus.

Skip to 1 minute and 20 seconds TEACHER: So what’s the minus?

Skip to 1 minute and 22 seconds TEACHER: What ion is it?

Skip to 1 minute and 25 seconds TEACHER: Have a look here.

Skip to 1 minute and 26 seconds TEACHER: Which one could you use to balance it out?

Skip to 1 minute and 28 seconds STUDENT: This.

Skip to 1 minute and 29 seconds TEACHER: Yeah, so the chlorine ion. So the chloride. So now what would your formula be with that?

Skip to 1 minute and 37 seconds STUDENT: [INAUDIBLE] so MG2.

Skip to 1 minute and 41 seconds TEACHER: How many have I got?

Skip to 1 minute and 42 seconds STUDENT: [INAUDIBLE]

Skip to 1 minute and 46 seconds TEACHER: Write what you think.

Skip to 1 minute and 48 seconds STUDENT: Mg would be 20.

Skip to 1 minute and 53 seconds TEACHER: What’s wrong with that?

Skip to 1 minute and 55 seconds STUDENT: It would be in the front.

Skip to 1 minute and 57 seconds TEACHER: OK, so if it’s at the front, it means I’ve got two of everything.

Skip to 1 minute and 59 seconds TEACHER: So I would have two magnesium. Good.

Skip to 2 minutes and 3 seconds TEACHER: OK, remember that’s what you’re bonding. That’s about how many you’ve got. Big is about how many you’ve got.

Skip to 2 minutes and 7 seconds TEACHER: Little is about the bonding

Skip to 2 minutes and 9 seconds STUDENT: So then little one just shows which, and on the element [INAUDIBLE].

Skip to 2 minutes and 14 seconds TEACHER: All of it.

Skip to 2 minutes and 15 seconds STUDENT: I get it now.

Skip to 2 minutes and 16 seconds TEACHER: OK, happy?

Skip to 2 minutes and 18 seconds Year 7 (age 11-12) Maths: balancing equations

Skip to 2 minutes and 21 seconds TEACHER: Let’s have a look. Is this your true pile? Let’s just spread them out. Have a look at this one. What’s happened from that side to that side?

Skip to 2 minutes and 35 seconds STUDENT: That’s lost two.

Skip to 2 minutes and 36 seconds TEACHER: Has it lost two? What was two less on this side? If we take away two, what would we have from this side?

Skip to 2 minutes and 46 seconds TEACHER: We’ve got 13 on that side. But what would we have on this side? We’d just have 3A wouldn’t we? So to get to 3A take away two, how many do we have to take away to get from plus two to take away two. We need to take away four, don’t we? Have we taken four from that side?

Skip to 3 minutes and 2 seconds STUDENT: No.

Skip to 3 minutes and 3 seconds TEACHER: So is that one true? Good.

Skip to 3 minutes and 13 seconds Good.

Skip to 3 minutes and 18 seconds TEACHER: No, I like this. Have a look at those. Why isn’t that one true? Can you explain why that one isn’t true?

Skip to 3 minutes and 29 seconds STUDENT: Because 30A are 130 plus 2.

Skip to 3 minutes and 34 seconds TEACHER: Hold on. 30A is–

Skip to 3 minutes and 37 seconds STUDENT: 130.

Skip to 3 minutes and 38 seconds TEACHER: Why?

Skip to 3 minutes and 39 seconds STUDENT: Because you times it by 10.

Skip to 3 minutes and 42 seconds TEACHER: Right. OK. So we’re basing it on another one here, 3A.

Skip to 3 minutes and 51 seconds TEACHER: Is that what you’re basing it on? Yeah, good. So and then now 2.

Skip to 3 minutes and 55 seconds STUDENT: And then add 2 [INAUDIBLE].

Skip to 3 minutes and 57 seconds TEACHER: Great. Well done.

Skip to 3 minutes and 58 seconds STUDENT: Oh, so we’re done.

Skip to 4 minutes and 4 seconds TEACHER: Fantastic. So explain to me what you’ve done there, straightaway.

Skip to 4 minutes and 17 seconds 0 subtract 2. So that’s what were looking at before. If I have nothing, if I have no apples, can you take two apples from me? So is the answer going to be 2? I think what you might have done there is you have done it the other way around. You’ve subtracted 0 from 2. So if you can’t do it in units, Colin, what was that mathematical word that we were using?

Skip to 4 minutes and 47 seconds So what are you going to do?

Skip to 4 minutes and 48 seconds STUDENT: Exchange that [INAUDIBLE]..

Skip to 4 minutes and 50 seconds TEACHER: Colin, show me how you do that.

Skip to 5 minutes and 6 seconds Fab. Carry on. Yeah.

Skip to 5 minutes and 10 seconds TEACHER: Just going to– do that so I know that you’ve had a little go to it, OK? Roll this bit out, and then you’ve started up perfectly, OK? But let’s get rid of it so that you can insert more clearly. Brilliant. So you’ve done it perfectly there. Just have a look in terms of you’ve done 0 subtract 2. So we needed to exchange. So we’re going to have to go all the way to the [INAUDIBLE] to exchange that, OK? Liam, will you and Luka work together for second, please? So Leon started this bit correctly. Can you see that he’s seen that he can’t subtract 2 from 0. So he’s tried to go to the next column.

Skip to 6 minutes and 10 seconds He’s gone to the hundreds column here. And can you see here he’s then exchanged one of the hundreds for 10 10s. He started it. What’s the bit he needs to do next?

Skip to 6 minutes and 21 seconds STUDENT: Exchange that 4.

Skip to 6 minutes and 22 seconds TEACHER: Yeah, absolutely. So you’ve done the first bit correctly. But if you work together to get this done, I think that Luka can help you with that last bit, and he can help you with that first bit, OK? Yeah? I’ll call back in a bit.

Skip to 6 minutes and 33 seconds Year 1 (age 5-6) Maths: finding quarters

Skip to 6 minutes and 37 seconds TEACHER: Girls, what are we doing over here? What have we split our shapes into? How many? 2. If we split our shapes into two, what are we finding?

Skip to 6 minutes and 48 seconds Do we find the quarter or a half?

Skip to 6 minutes and 51 seconds STUDENT: Half.

Skip to 6 minutes and 52 seconds TEACHER: We’ll find the half. But we wanted a quarter, didn’t we? So how many do we to split them into? We need to split them into 4. I’ve got your first one again. Finish the one you are on.

Skip to 7 minutes and 6 seconds Well done. Right.

Spotting opportunities for learning

The video above shows a number of examples of our teachers highlighting errors as opportunities to learn in their lessons. You do not have to watch the whole video. We’d like you to choose one of the clips and identify which characteristics of feedback you spot and how it helped their students. The clips start at the times listed below:

0:06 - Year 11 (age 15-16) Science: the heart and double circulation
0:49 - Year 9 (age 13-14) Science: chemical bonding
2:18 - Year 7 (age 11-12) Maths: balancing equations
4:01 - Year 3 (age 7-8) Maths: formal methods of subtraction
6:33 - Year 1 (age 5-6) Maths: finding quarters

You might like to link them to some of ideas that we have identified so far:

  1. Links to learning goals;
  2. Identifies next steps for the learner;
  3. Requires action from the learner;
  4. Occurs during the learning;
  5. Is specific by clearly addressing the questions: Where am I going? (What are the goals?), How am I doing? (What progress has been made toward the goal?), and Where to next? (What discrepancies are there in relation to the goal, so what actions needs to be taken next?).
  6. Looks to improve the learner not the task i.e. it is medical not post-mortem;
  7. Involves teachers and students together discussing ideas through interactions as loops or ping-pong rather than being given as a gift;
  8. Uses errors to deepen learning experiences.

Identify

Choose ONE of the teachers in the video and describe which of the feedback characteristics they used and how it helped their students.

How does this help you think about what you do in your lessons?

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This video is from the free online course:

Feedback for Learning: Implementing Formative Assessment

National STEM Learning Centre