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Skip to 0 minutes and 6 seconds Year 11 (age 15-16) Science: the heart and double circulation

Skip to 0 minutes and 10 seconds TEACHER: So if we just stop what we’re doing, I’m going to come around and give you guys marker pens. And you can come and add a bit of detail onto our Venn diagram. If you’re not adding detail, make sure you’re correcting yours to make sure you’ve got enough detail in your answer. So pens coming to your tables. Come up and write something on the board. If you’re not writing, make sure you’re checking to make sure you’ve got enough detail. Let’s go. Who going first? Come on, Shauna. Come on, Joan. Write something on the board. Come on, Seth. Go and put something on the board. So red pens in hand, correcting your answer.

Skip to 0 minutes and 50 seconds You going to go and write something on the board?

Skip to 0 minutes and 52 seconds STUDENT: Yeah.

Skip to 0 minutes and 53 seconds TEACHER: Well done.

Skip to 0 minutes and 58 seconds Oh, Beth.

Skip to 1 minute and 0 seconds STUDENT: What? Is that wrong?

Skip to 1 minute and 3 seconds TEACHER: Say it out loud for me. How do you say it?

Skip to 1 minute and 8 seconds We’ll see. Still wrong.

Skip to 1 minute and 14 seconds There we go.

Skip to 1 minute and 21 seconds Is that linked to the heart or the blood? So is it– it’s correct. But is it relevant to the question?

Skip to 1 minute and 27 seconds STUDENT: No.

Skip to 1 minute and 28 seconds TEACHER: No.

Skip to 1 minute and 29 seconds STUDENT: I’m going to write that.

Skip to 1 minute and 31 seconds TEACHER: Which one are you going to write? Yeah, what are they for though?

Skip to 1 minute and 34 seconds STUDENT: Stops the blood–

Skip to 1 minute and 35 seconds TEACHER: Go on then. Add it. You added it?

Skip to 1 minute and 37 seconds STUDENT: There’s haemoglobin in this one.

Skip to 1 minute and 39 seconds STUDENT: It’s not part of the question. It’s not linked to the question.

Skip to 1 minute and 42 seconds TEACHER: Why is it not linked to the question?

Skip to 1 minute and 44 seconds STUDENT: Because it’s not a structure.

Skip to 1 minute and 46 seconds TEACHER: It’s not a structure. It’s part of the blood. So be checking yours, make sure you’ve got enough information. Grab your red pens, add any information that you’ve missed. How are you getting on?

Skip to 2 minutes and 13 seconds David, what have they missed?

Skip to 2 minutes and 21 seconds Anything you’ve got there that they missed? Got anything else? Jazmin, they missed anything?

Skip to 2 minutes and 28 seconds STUDENT: Heart strings.

Skip to 2 minutes and 30 seconds TEACHER: Oh, what are they?

Skip to 2 minutes and 32 seconds STUDENT: They hold the valves to make sure that they didn’t go the wrong way. It stops the blood from once passing through, does it go back the way it came?

Skip to 2 minutes and 42 seconds TEACHER: OK. They got valves on there, haven’t they? Have they got anything about named blood vessels?

Skip to 2 minutes and 48 seconds STUDENT: No. Just the one.

Skip to 2 minutes and 51 seconds TEACHER: Have you got anymore?

Skip to 2 minutes and 53 seconds STUDENT: Yeah, the pulmonary artery

Skip to 2 minutes and 55 seconds TEACHER: Anything if you’ve missed, girls, that you’re adding? OK, then who’s happy to get started on their six mark answer?

Skip to 3 minutes and 3 seconds STUDENT: Yeah.

Skip to 3 minutes and 4 seconds TEACHER: Kim, how are you going to lay it out?

Skip to 3 minutes and 6 seconds STUDENT: I’m going to write about the right side first. And then say, however, the left side does this. And then that overall they both– and then explain it.

Skip to 3 minutes and 17 seconds TEACHER: Come on, try that again in the proper sentence, Kim. How are you going to lay out your answer?

Skip to 3 minutes and 24 seconds STUDENT: Talk about the right side and what their roles are. And then talk about the left side and say it’s different from what the right side does. And then say overall what they both do.

Skip to 3 minutes and 36 seconds TEACHER: OK. So Kim’s going to talk about the right side first, then the left side, and then the things they have in common. So how the structures in each side of the heart relate to their functions. I might add a few more bits and pieces on. So keeping an eye the board. I might add a bit more information just to even it up.

Skip to 4 minutes and 25 seconds So a few more hints on the board in the green. Things to bulk out your answer with.

Skip to 4 minutes and 32 seconds Year 3 (age 7-8) Maths: formal methods of subtraction.

Skip to 4 minutes and 34 seconds TEACHER: Just come on to the carpet for me, please.

Skip to 4 minutes and 41 seconds Will you come sit on the carpet for me, please?

Skip to 4 minutes and 46 seconds Come and sit on the carpet for me, please.

Skip to 4 minutes and 52 seconds Sorry. If anyone else is– Can you do this, guys? Please, do this. Just so I can see that you’re listening. I don’t want anything in your hands. I should say Mrs. Pryor and nobody else can do this. We on the carpet are just going to go through two more examples that are like number two and three. OK, so when you’re exchanging and including a zero, if you’re a little bit unsure still and you just would like a little more help, please come and sit down with me. If you feel confident that, yeah, you’ve got this, feel for to crack on, OK? But now is an opportunity to come and do that.

Skip to 5 minutes and 25 seconds Anyone who wants to just come and see another example, come now. So say if I have–

Skip to 5 minutes and 35 seconds I think it’s 800 in your actual question, isn’t it? It’s the same issue again. I cannot do 8 subtract– sorry, 0 subtract 4. What some of you are doing at the moment is thinking that you can just switch them round, like with addition. Subtraction is not like that. Commutativity doesn’t count, OK? You cannot do 4 subtract 0. So I do not want to see 4 in there. OK, we’re going to use the same process again. We just have to be careful that we’re spotting when we need to do it. Because that’s the issue at the moment is we don’t know, Abigail, when we need to do it. You know how to do it, just not when.

Skip to 6 minutes and 6 seconds OK, so Ames, what are we going to do?

Skip to 6 minutes and 9 seconds STUDENT: You change the two 0s into tens.

Skip to 6 minutes and 12 seconds TEACHER: How? How?

Skip to 6 minutes and 13 seconds STUDENT: You put, like, a 1 next to the 0 and you takeaway 4 from it.

Skip to 6 minutes and 19 seconds TEACHER: I can’t just do that straightaway though, because I don’t have 10. I need to exchange. Because I’m not going to add more to my 700. I still only have 700 to begin with. I need to get those values somewhere from within this 700. So where is the first place I can start?

Skip to 6 minutes and 38 seconds STUDENT: On the 7.

Skip to 6 minutes and 39 seconds TEACHER: In the 7, brilliant. OK, I have to start there. This is, I think, where we might have got it a little bit wrong in your answer. You’ve got to start with what we already have. OK, so Tony, are you happy with this? That that becomes 600?

Skip to 6 minutes and 51 seconds STUDENT: No.

Skip to 6 minutes and 52 seconds TEACHER: Why not?

Skip to 6 minutes and 53 seconds STUDENT: Because on the tens, you need one for the ten. And on the unit column, you need one for the unit so it has to be 5.

Skip to 7 minutes and 6 seconds TEACHER: You’re right. However, it doesn’t have to be 5. And this is why, because we need to remember that this is 100, yep, and not seven 1s, Abigail. It’s 100. So once we’ve moved that 100 to here, so this becomes 10, OK? Then I can exchange from here. So I don’t need to take another 100 from here. I’m just taking the one for ten 10s, because ten 10s is 100. And that can then become 9 when I take one of those 10s and put it here, OK? So Abigail, Amy, Tony, are you happy that– can you see that I’ve only taken one of the hundreds.

Skip to 7 minutes and 46 seconds So this then has ten 10s which I’ve then taken one of those from here to become ten 1s. And at this point, I can then start the subtraction, 10 subtract 4 is 6. 90 subtract 20 is 70. And 600 subtract 200 is 400. OK, have a go at number two or three. I’ll be with you in a minute.

Skip to 8 minutes and 8 seconds Good work. Brett, can you go into [INAUDIBLE] last place for the last five minutes? Thank you. Mewalsh, could you just work with Olivia on that [INAUDIBLE] problem for a minute and just explain to her your thinking? Can you going get it from my chair, please? It’s the [INAUDIBLE] problem that you started last week, you can do it on a sheet. It doesn’t need to go in there. All right, thank you. So let’s have a look. If it helps, start it again under here so then you’ve got a fresh start. 800 subtract 542. Happy for you to start it again here, if that helps. Brill, Brill. A bit happy with that now? Yeah?

Skip to 8 minutes and 55 seconds Can you check your calculations on the second one, please? I think you understand it. You just made a silly error.

Skip to 9 minutes and 5 seconds Can you just check your calculations there, please? 13 subtract 8 is not 4. And 10 subtract 2 is not 7. You’ve done all of it correctly, just a silly mistake there.

Oral feedback examples

At the end of Week 1 we defined feedback as:

Useful information generated with an agent (teacher, peer, book, parent, self or personal experience including practical work) which supports learning, relates to learning goals, regarding aspects of one’s performance or understanding, and is utilised to improve one’s learning.

Here we see teachers talking with their students, during whole class, small group and individual interactions, where they focus on discussing useful information which supports learning, linked to how students are performing in the lesson, to help them improve. You do not need to watch the whole video, but select one of the clips in the video:

0:06 - Year 11 (age 15-16) Science: the heart and double circulation
4:32 - Year 3 (age 7-8) Maths: formal methods of subtraction

Observe and identify

Can you spot any instances of when the teachers were focusing their interactions on:

  • The success criteria – Where am I going?
  • Progress information - How am I doing?
  • Discrepancy information – Where to next?
  • Using open questions – Making students think

How did the teachers make the students think?

How do you think these interactions helped the students learning?

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This video is from the free online course:

Feedback for Learning: Implementing Formative Assessment

National STEM Learning Centre