3.2

Skip to 0 minutes and 1 secondHello, everyone. In this week's content, we will look at sources and the types of food contaminants that impact on human health, how we can measure exposure, and finally how we regulate and the control of contaminants so as to reduce risks to human health. From previous weeks, you have already heard about some of the recent food scandals that have affected consumers. To feed the world population, the increasing food demand and fast globalisation pose more challenges to food safety and food security. Food contaminants have never been such a hot topic in both our daily life and at the level of the most advanced food research.

Skip to 0 minutes and 46 secondsFood is made up from a mixture of different chemicals. The majority of these chemicals are naturally in our diet and provide us with nutrients we need for life, including proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, minerals, and vitamins.

Skip to 1 minute and 7 secondsNot all naturally occurring chemicals are good for us, however. And some can be toxic in the acute or chronic exposure. For instance, when food becomes mouldy, the fungi can produce toxic chemicals that contaminate food. Also, during food processing, for example, when meat is overcooked, harmful chemicals like heterocyclic amines are formed. In this topic, we will look at a number of different food contaminants, including mycotoxins and heterocyclic amines, with a focus on their adverse effect on human health.

Welcome from Dr. Yun Yun Gong

In this welcome from Dr. Yun Yun Gong we are provided with an outline for this week.

We will begin by looking at some common food contaminants and in later steps Dr. Geraldine Cuskelly will explore the impact that heterocyclic amines (HCAs) can have on human health.

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This video is from the free online course:

Tackling Global Food Safety

Queen's University Belfast