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Skip to 0 minutes and 6 secondsI'm Michael Zev Gordon and I teach composition here at the University of Birmingham.

Skip to 0 minutes and 16 secondsI sometimes think of music as a kind of meeting place between the emotions and mathematics, between the heart and the brain, if you like. Having the chance to study the brain and its processes, how it processes information and the emotions, well, that could bring valuable insight for me in to understanding how music works within us. As a composer I've been involved with two projects now to do with science. I've written a piece to do with genetic patternings and another to do with consciousness. Doing these, I've come to realise just how complementary the arts and the sciences can be. A number of our students here take a course studying music in the brain.

Skip to 0 minutes and 59 secondsAnd I think they too must come to see just how exciting and revealing a cross-disciplinary approach to inquiry is-- looking at the same objects but from different angles.

Perspective: music & the brain

Professor Michael Zev Gordon discusses how studying the workings of the brain can give insight into the creative and emotional impact of music.

Can you think of any other examples of the potential relationship between creativity or emotion, and physical brain function? Add your comments below.

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This video is from the free online course:

Good Brain, Bad Brain: Basics

University of Birmingham