Skip to 0 minutes and 7 secondsYou mentioned earlier that you've had some difficult feelings about being a mother. Can you tell me more about those feelings?

Skip to 0 minutes and 17 secondsI don't know if I can.

Skip to 0 minutes and 22 secondsI get really scared when I talk about my feelings, and I usually just close down. My partner, he tries to get me to talk about it, but he can't. And then he just gets upset with me because we always used to be so honest with each other. OK. You mentioned that you feel scared when you talk about your feelings. Can you tell me about what's making you feel that way?

Skip to 0 minutes and 51 secondsI just don't want to say something that's going to make people think that I can't take care of my baby. I love him, and I would never do anything to harm him. But I just don't believe that people would believe that if they knew how I was feeling. OK. I understand why you might think that. It's a very common feeling amongst mothers that their feelings are so severe that it warrants having their baby removed from their care. And whilst in some cases that actually is necessary, it's really only in the extreme cases where there's no other support network for the baby and the mother requires immediate intervention from multiple agencies of support.

Skip to 1 minute and 33 secondsAnd you've shown to me such caring for your baby that that result seems unlikely for you.

What PND looks like and how you can support your client

Here is a video of a conversation between a therapist and a client named Tamala, who is experiencing PND.

This video will give you an insight into what post-natal depression (PND) looks like and how you as a therapist or Psychological Wellbeing Practioner (PWP) can support your clients.

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This video is from the free online course:

Addressing Postnatal Depression as a Healthcare Professional

University of Exeter

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