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Glossary

We have created a glossary to help you with some heritage specific terms used in this course that you may be unfamiliar with. You will also find a downloadable PDF version of this glossary in the downloads section at the end of the step.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

A

Adaptive reuse: process by which structurally sound older buildings are developed for economically viable new uses (Austin, 1988).

Authenticity: authenticity is culturally constructed and is therefore context and place specific; authentic places and buildings represent and embody cultural processes of production.

B

Burra Charter: a document that guides decision making and best practice standard for managing cultural heritage places in Australia.

C

Conservation: a broad term that refers to different heritage processes including preservation, change maintenance, restoration and reconstruction.

Cultural heritage: “is the legacy of physical artefacts and intangible attributes of a group or society that are inherited from past generations, maintained in the present and bestowed for the benefit of future generations.” (UNESCO, n.d.)

I

ICOMOS: an acronym that stands for International Council on Monuments and Sites; this global organisation is a professional body that guides and supports projects that conserve and protect our heritage places around the world.

Intangible heritage: often described as cultural heritage, this form of heritage recognition applies to oral histories, performing arts, social practices and festivals among other things.

N

Nara Document: focuses on cultural heritage and provides guidelines for the conservation of cultural heritage (ICOMOS, 1994).

P

Place values: refers to the subjective value people have for a specific place.

Place making: refers to the practices of building and creating places that people value.

Preservation: refers to looking after the fabric of historic assets to ensure their survival; this process ensures the original fabric remains largely unchanged.

R

Reconstruction: similar to restoration, reconstruction may involve modern technologies and materials to rebuild a heritage asset to ensure its sustainability and viability.

Rehabilitation: a variety of repairs or alterations to an existing building that allow it to serve contemporary uses while preserving features of the past (Bookout, 1990).

Restoration: often refers to rebuilding of heritage assets to match their original condition; using techniques and materials that match the original fabric.

S

Significance: refers to the value placed on a heritage asset on grounds relating to its history, scientific value, aesthetic values, and community values. The significance of a heritage asset may be assessed for one or more of these values.

T

Tangible heritage: “includes buildings and historic places, monuments, artifacts, etc., which are considered worthy of preservation for the future.” (UNESCO, n.d.)

U

UNESCO: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization


Your task

Having looked at some of the language we will be using to discuss heritage, do you think you would adjust your knowledge barometer?

Share your thoughts in the comments.

References

Austin, R. L. (1988). Adaptive reuse: Issues and case studies in building preservation. D. G. Woodcock, W. C. Steward, & R. A. Forrester (Eds.). New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold.

Bookout, L. W. Jr. (1990). Residential Development Handbook (2nd ed.). Washington, D.C.: Urban Land Institute.

UNESCO. (n.d.). Tangible Cultural Heritage. Retrieved from http://www.unesco.org/new/en/cairo/culture/tangible-cultural-heritage

ICOMOS (1994). The Nara Document on Authenticity. In Lemaire, R. & Stovel, H. (Eds.), Proceedings from the Nara Conference on Authenticity in Relation to the World Heritage Convention. Nara, Japan: ICOMOS. Retrieved from https://www.icomos.org/charters/nara-e.pdf

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This article is from the free online course:

Cities of Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow: Why Heritage Conservation Matters

Griffith University

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