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Skip to 0 minutes and 6 secondsHello, and welcome to Combatting Antimicrobial resistance through Infection Control. My name is Laura Bowater and I am a Professor of Microbiology Education and Engagement in the Norwich Medical School, at the University of East Anglia. Throughout my career as a research scientist, and more recently as someone with a passion for Public Health, I have become more and more concerned about the growing problem of antimicrobial resistance. To put it simply, we really are facing a future where infections that we currently treat with antibiotics are once again going to become life-threatening illnesses, that we will be unable to treat. Infectious diseases are set to return as the leading cause of death, outstripping heart disease and cancer.

Skip to 0 minutes and 49 secondsNow this is a global, complicated issue that isn't going to be easy to solve but we can't afford to ignore it, because it's not going to go away. As healthcare and social care professionals ,involved in the day-to-day care of clients, residents and patients, you'll be familiar with healthcare associated infections. And over the next three weeks we will use videos, articles, and discussion steps to introduce you to the ways that infectious diseases can be acquired and spread, and how this contributes to the global risk of antimicrobial resistance. But most importantly, this module has been designed to empower you to understand why, and provide guidance on how you can use effective infection control measures in your day-to-day work and home environment.

Skip to 1 minute and 35 secondsAnd this will help us to combat the growing problem of antimicrobial resistant infections. This will allow you to better protect the patients, clients, and residents in your care from acquiring these health associated infections. And I look forward to working with you on this as we go throughout the course.

Welcome to the course

We really are facing a future where infections that we currently treat with antibiotics are once again going to become life-threatening illnesses that we will be unable to treat.

Infectious diseases are set to return as the leading cause of death, outstripping heart disease and cancer. Now this is a global, complicated issue that isn’t going to be easy to solve but we cannot afford to ignore it because it isn’t going to go away.

As healthcare and social care professionals involved in the day-to-day care of clients, residents and patient you will be familiar with health care associated infections.

We will introduce you to the ways that infectious diseases can be acquired and spread and how this contributes to the global risk of antibiotic resistance. Moreover we will empower you to understand why and provide guidance on how you can use effective infection control measures in your day to day work and home environments, to combat the growing problem of antimicrobial resistant infections.

This will allow you to better protect the patients, clients and residents in your care, from acquiring healthcare associated infections.

You will often come across ‘antimicrobial’ and ‘antibiotic’ being used interchangeably. This is because an ‘ANTIBIOTIC’ is a medicine used to prevent and treat bacterial infections. On the other hand, an “ANTIMICROBIAL’ is any drug that is used to treat an infection. This includes the antibiotics used to treat bacterial infections but it also includes other drugs used to treat the infections caused by other microbes such as viruses (e.g. HIV): the antiviral drugs. Antimicrobials also include the antifungals that are used to treat fungal infections such as Thrush (e.g. Candida).

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This video is from the free online course:

Using Infection Control to Combat Antimicrobial Resistance

UEA (University of East Anglia)