Skip to 0 minutes and 3 secondsThroughout the course we have explored how different types of questions elicit evidence that helps drive learning in science classrooms. Every teacher needs a repertoire of questions in the classroom, and the selection of questions needs to take careful account of the context. Sometimes, we need questions and activities that encourage dialogue. It's through this interchange of ideas that both the teacher and the learners begin to hone in on what is understood and what isn't. Questions that prompt discussion, that you importantly listen in on, may give you more insight into individual students' misconceptions. Some teachers worry that students may lead others along wrong lines of thinking in group discussion. This hasn't been our experience.

Skip to 0 minutes and 50 secondsProvided your focus is on ensuring that when students bounce ideas off one another, they are developing their ideas about concepts, or increasing their confidence in fluency, and expressing themselves scientifically, or mathematically, then you should find the learning in your students is actually enhanced. At other times, the teacher needs to check on how well new ideas have been taken on. It's at these junctures that hinge point questions are most useful. With hinge point questions, the evidence produced gives you a quick check on the thinking of all the students in the class. The immediate feedback that a teacher gets from using hinge point questions is an extremely useful tool in deciding on those next steps.

Skip to 1 minute and 37 secondsGetting the balance between these two approaches to using questions is, of course, important. This week our focus moves on to explore the action that you take on the evidence that your questions elicit.

Taking action on the evidence

This week our focus moves on to explore the action that you take on the evidence that your questions elicit.

In this video Chris emphasises how every teacher needs a repertoire of questions from which to select - taking account of the context. She stresses the importance of planning when to use hinge-point questions and when to spend time raising questions that encourage students to think and talk.

Whereas hinge-point questions give you a quick check on the thinking of all of the students in the class, questions that prompt discussion may give you more insight into individual students’ misconceptions.

The focus of the week ahead is on the action you take on the evidence that your questions elicit

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This video is from the free online course:

Introducing Assessment for Learning

National STEM Learning Centre