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This content is taken from the Keio University's online course, 古書から読み解く日本の文化: 和本の世界. Join the course to learn more.

Skip to 0 minutes and 3 seconds I now see how important scrolls were in traditional bookmaking. What you have in your hands now is a book-style format though, Wa wide-page fukurotoji. Yes, it’s an illustrated book. The colors are very vivid; there is even gold leaf. It’s a particularly luxurious item. It’s what is known as a Nara ehon. They were very common in the 17th century, weren’t they? Yes. By the 17th century they were common, but they didn’t exist in the first half of the 16th century. That’s odd. They don’t look particularly unusual to me. And yet in the first half of the 16th century few would have thought of putting pictures in a book of this kind.

Skip to 0 minutes and 54 seconds Coming to think of it, I can’t think of an early illustrated book that isn’t a scroll. Exactly. Since the early days of Japanese bookmaking in the 8th century, the only books to be illustrated were scrolls (known as emaki, or, “picture scrolls”). But that changed in the 16th century. That’s an interesting development. Yes, it was one of the turning points in Japanese book history. Continuing from our discussion of book formats last week, this week we look at the history of illustrated books.

第2週について

この週は、装訂と内容の関係について詳しく見ていきます。また、改装についても学んでいきましょう。そして、和歌物語の写本絵入り本の特徴を、8世紀から17世紀頃までを対象として通史的に学んでいきます。

日本的な文学作品は、漢字から派生して生まれた平仮名を主に用いて書かれています。和歌を中心とする韻文学作品と、物語を中心とする散文学作品では、それらが保存される書物にも形態的な違いがありました。また挿絵が加えられた書物も数多く作製され、文字だけの書物とはやや異なる独自の発達をとげています。

ビデオで紹介した書籍

Week 2の資料

Week 2 の記事とビデオ字幕は、PDFで提供されています。DOWNLOADS のセクションからダウンロードしてください。

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This video is from the free online course:

古書から読み解く日本の文化: 和本の世界

Keio University