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Skip to 0 minutes and 5 secondsHi. In week 1, we introduced the week’s content from the Ryōsoku-in temple, part of the Kenninji temple complex in Kyoto, and in Week 2 we began our journey from the Ashikaga Gakkō in Ashikaga City, Tochigi prefecture. For Week 3, we are at the Keio Institute of Oriental Classics (Shidō Bunko) on Keio University’s Mita campus. The Ryōsoku-in and the Ashikaga Gakkō are among the few libraries that have been uninterruptedly collective and preserving Chinese books since the medieval period. In the modern period, many similar institutions have had to let go of their collections, or have ceased to exist altogether, and their content has scattered. Some items are now being looked after by new owners, but many have been lost.

Skip to 0 minutes and 53 secondsThe Keio Institute of Oriental Classics acquires Chinese-language works when they become available on the antique book market. Here I have prepared items that were once housed in medieval Zen temples. The theme of Week 3 adn 4 is how these books and other similar ones from the Edo period were received, and the research activity and practices that flourished around them. The term ‘works in Chinese’ (kanseki) encompasses a wide range of texts in a variety of genres. However, since I am a literature specialist, our focus will be literary works, particularly poetry collections.

Welcome to Week 3

The theme of Week 3 is how works in Chinese (kanseki in Japanese) were read and studied in the Edo period, and the research activity and practices that flourished around them. Watch Prof. Horikawa show some of these works.

The PDF version of the course handout for Week 3 is available in the DOWNLOADS section below.

Some words and names that may be unfamiliar to learners are listed in the glossary for each week. For Week 3, it’s located in the last step of this week. The PDF version is also available.

Keywords introduced in the video

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This video is from the free online course:

Sino-Japanese Interactions Through Rare Books

Keio University

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