3.23

Weekly summary

It’s been great seeing so many of you engage with the last week’s themes of tortious liability, particularly with the number of rich responses to Melissa Castan’s introduction to torts law, Tony Trespasser and Careless Colin.

Over 80% of respondents think that the ‘neighbour principle’ laid down in Donoghue v Stevenson is one that everyday people can understand, apply and live with comfortably

Thanks to all of you that responded to the poll on Step 3.5 So what?, where I asked you to share your views on the ‘neighbour principle’ laid down in Donoghue v Stevenson is one that everyday people can understand, apply and live with comfortably.

So far, 84.2% of respondents told us that they think the ‘neighbour principle’ is one that is understood by everyday people.

If you haven’t already, consider taking some time to respond to the poll and then sharing with other learners your thoughts on your decision.

Over 90% of respondents think the common law tests for assessing the calculus of negligence are an effective method to measure the ‘standard of care'

On Step 3.12, I asked you to share your views on the common law tests for assessing the calculus of negligence.

So far, 94.5% of respondents think the common law tests for assessing the calculus of negligence (probability, gravity, social utility, precautions) are an effective method to measure the ‘standard of care’, which is fascinating to learn.

Have you had the chance to respond to the poll or share with other learners your thoughts on this topic? If not, considering taking the time to respond.

Law for Non-Lawyers on YouTube

If you’re curious to learn about Lloyd’s thoughts on tortious liability, you may be interested in some of the earlier discussions about torts he’s had that are available for you to watch on the Law for Non-Lawyers YouTube channel.

This is an additional video, hosted on YouTube.

Check your progress

As you make your way through the course, you might like to check your progress. You can do this by selecting the Progress tab where you’ll see what percentage of the course steps you’ve marked as complete.

Mark as complete

When you are finished on this step, select the Mark as complete button before moving on to the next step. Continue to mark each step as complete as you make your way through the course.


Share this article:

This article is from the free online course:

Law for Non-Lawyers: Introduction to Law

Monash University