Learners completing this week's study group task.

This week’s study group task

Learn more about your study group task for Week 2.

This week is all about criminal law, where society itself governs the behaviour of its citizens. In your study group this week, you’re going to analyse the comments surrounding poll responses and then collate key themes and arguments supporting each perspective.

What you need to do

  1. As a group, decide who will be your reporter for this week’s task. Their job is to share with other learners what you’ve produced as a group. Consider having more than one reporter in your study group, if there happens to be a need later in the week.

  2. By yourself, work through the course, completing So what? Afterwards, review the results of the poll and then work through the comments made by other learners. Analyse the comments supporting both the ‘Yes’ and ‘No’ poll answers and then collate key themes and arguments supporting each perspective. Share your work with your group.

  3. As a group, discuss the key themes arising then compile a list (in an agreed comparable format) of the arguments raised.

  4. If you’re the reporter, share the list with other learners in the Comments section the Weekly feedback for Week 2 step by Thursday 9 February.


We'd love for the work you produce as a study group to meet the 1200 character limit of the comments, but if you find that you're working on a longer piece of writing with your study group or just need a place to workshop your ideas, consider using temporary text hosting tools like Pastie or NoteHub. Find out more about using Temporary text hosting.

At the end of this week, learners who have joined a study group will share the work they’ve produced for this week’s study group task. Once they have, be sure to provide your own constructive feedback and commentary.

If you missed this week’s group task, or are catching up with the course - you’re not alone - be sure to provide your own constructive feedback and commentary.


Share this article:

This article is from the free online course:

Law for Non-Lawyers: Introduction to Law

Monash University