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This content is taken from the National STEM Learning Centre's online course, Linking Curriculum Learning to STEM Careers. Join the course to learn more.

Skip to 0 minutes and 6 seconds This part of the course will show how it is possible for teachers, working alongside careers leaders, to bring classroom learning to life in partnership with local employers. It will also show how this partnership approach can make efficient use of employers’ time and resources, encouraging long-term relationships. So, for example, year 7 students learning about ‘oxidation’ in Science lessons at Brookfield Community School in Chesterfield were challenged to prepare a board room pitch for United Cast Bar, half a mile down the road, about how their cast iron products are improved by using innovative coatings.

Skip to 0 minutes and 45 seconds Year 9 students at Kenton School in Tyneside, applied what they had learned about data and graphs to real information provided by Datatrial, a local, fast-growing high-tech company specialising in data management for clinical trials. There are many more examples like these. But the question most teachers ask – and is probably at the front of your mind right now – is ‘How much of my time is it going to take?’ The answer is ‘some’, but only a similar amount to that required when planning any good lesson. This week you’ll look at a process that starts with a scheme of work or topic with which students struggle to engage and leads towards involving employers in the curriculum.

Skip to 1 minute and 28 seconds Focus on the benefits to you as teachers and to your students’ learning – before considering what you might say to a potential employer partner. Learning must always be at the heart of this process.

Why work with employers and local industries?

Most schools and colleges engage with local employers in one way or another, maybe you have a work experience programme or have an employer volunteer on your governing body?

This week will show how it is possible for schools and colleges to bring classroom learning to life in partnership with local employers. It will also show how this partnership approach can make efficient use of employers’ time and resources, encouraging long-term relationships.

Discuss

As we start this week, in the comments below share what you believe are:

  1. The benefits to students when employers are brought into the classroom.
  2. The benefits to employers who are involved in school or college education.

Note: whilst we refer to employers being brought into school, or students visiting places of work, online meetings and virtual tours are an alternative way for students to connect with local industries.

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This video is from the free online course:

Linking Curriculum Learning to STEM Careers

National STEM Learning Centre