Skip to 0 minutes and 6 secondsGERARD LISTON: The foundation of long-lasting relationships is trust and understanding. And the same principle applies to relationships between education and employers. We'd never expect a teacher to walk into a local employer and start managing the business. Likewise, we shouldn't expect an employer to be able to manage a class of young people. Creating an encounter with an employer that's embedded in classroom learning needs to be based on a clear understanding of respective roles. The teaching staff should remain responsible for lesson planning for lesson delivery, for classroom management, and for impact assessment. And the employer guests are responsible for providing the real information and resources for providing some kind of purposeful challenge, and for sharing their career stories.

Skip to 0 minutes and 53 secondsNEIL WILLIS: Employers don't necessarily understand the curriculum. Yes, they've all been a student. And they've all been at school or college. But that was a long time ago. And it can be quite an alien language. So it's just really putting that into perspective and starting with suggesting those ideas where there's links. And what we tend to find is that those discussions quickly snowball. And they become something that really sort of starts to gain momentum, and really does start to develop into either quite a short project. It might be something that is just done over in a lesson or two. Or something actually runs over a period of weeks.

Skip to 1 minute and 28 secondsANDREW CLARKE: In terms of embedding employers into the curriculum, be very, very clear about what you want them to do, OK? In terms of individual lessons, been very, very clear about how your STEM Ambassador can affect the outcome of that lesson. It's very, very important for you to do that. If you are talking about planning a scheme of work over a couple of terms, please bring your STEM Ambassadors in. Ask them for advice. Do some CPD with them. If you are a member of a cluster of schools, it could very well be that you get together with your science leads in other clusters, and actually work with particular employers on particular subjects.

Skip to 2 minutes and 11 secondsRemember, STEM Ambassadors are there for that purpose too. We count that as engagement, and very viable engagement too. So what I would say to teachers more than anything else is work with your STEM Ambassadors. Work with your employers. Make sure you know what you want to get out of them on a short term and a long term basis.

Skip to 2 minutes and 33 secondsGERARD: However, you find potential partners, you should have a compelling proposition in mind before making contact. What are we asking the employer to do? How will this contribute to curriculum learning? When is this scheduled to happen? And why should the employer get involved?

Be clear about what you need

Creating an encounter with an employer that is embedded in classroom learning needs to be based on a clear understanding of respective roles. This forms the foundation of a successful and ongoing employer partnership.

Teaching Staff are responsible for:

  • Lesson planning/delivery
  • Classroom management
  • Impact assessment

Employer Guests are responsible for

  • Real information/resources
  • Purposeful challenge
  • Sharing career stories

However you find potential partners, you should have a compelling proposition in mind before making contact. Make sure you have prepared answers to the following before making contact with an employer:

  • What are we asking the employer to do?
  • How will this contribute to curriculum learning?
  • When is this scheduled to happen?
  • Why should the employer get involved?

Comment

We’ve provided a starter for your discussions with employers. What else might you need to consider and at what point in developing a partnership would you discuss them?

This additional video includes STEM Ambassadors explaining the types of planning conversations they have with teachers in schools and colleges, when deciding what type of STEM activity they will run.

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This video is from the free online course:

Linking Curriculum Learning to STEM Careers

National STEM Learning Centre