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Skip to 0 minutes and 13 secondsPROF OONA CAMPBELL: We have now reached the end of our course,

Skip to 0 minutes and 15 secondsThe Lancet Maternal Health Series: Global Research and Evidence. I really hope you've enjoyed it's content and resources, and the diversity of the experts you've had access to. Over the last three weeks we've heard from a wide range of professionals discussing research and evidence on the state of the world's maternal health, and on health care, and on the quality of maternal health services, including those that provide "too little, too late", or "too much, too soon" in high-, middle-, and low-income countries. We began by looking at the epidemiology of maternal health, and at the configurations of health care services that aim to reach women with childbirth and other care.

Skip to 1 minute and 0 secondsWe also saw that for women using services, some receive excellent care, although a great many receive poor care or none at all. We acknowledge that there are shocks and opportunities coming from beyond the health system, and we've explored what's needed to improve the quality of care and reduce disparities in access to maternal health services, in order to secure future economic and social development. Together, we reflected on the future of maternal health globally, in the sustainable development goal era. Highlighting priorities for action by all of us, and in particular by researchers. I'd like to thank you all for joining our course and for participating so eagerly in discussions with our team and with your peers.

Skip to 1 minute and 47 secondsAnd in addition, I'd like to thank all the people who contributed to this course and helped to make it a success.

Skip to 1 minute and 55 secondsOver the last decade, there have been considerable shifts in maternal health outcomes and coverage, with new research and evidence produced to shape and informed future responses. We hope for strengthened, evidence-based care to improve maternal health globally, leaving no one behind, to ensure that every woman, every newborn, everywhere, has the right to good quality care. Thank you.

Ending remarks for the course

We have now reached the end of our course, The Lancet Maternal Health Series: Global Research & Evidence.

Over the last three weeks, we have heard from a wide range of professionals discussing research and evidence on the state of the world’s maternal health and health care, and the quality of maternal health care including “too little, too late” and “too much, too soon” in high-, middle- and low-income countries.

We began by looking at the epidemiology of maternal health, and at the configurations of health care services that aim to reach women with childbirth and other care. We also saw that for women using services, some receive excellent care, though a great many others receive poor care or none at all. We acknowledged that there are shocks and opportunities beyond the health system. We have explored what is needed to improve the quality of care and reduce disparities in access to maternal health services, in order to secure future economic and social development. Together, we reflected on the future of maternal health globally in the Sustainable Development Goal era, highlighting priorities for action by all of us, and in particular researchers.

Over the last decade, there have been considerable shifts in maternal health outcomes and coverage of care, with new research and evidence produced to shape and inform future responses. We hope for strengthened, evidence-based care to improve maternal health globally leaving no one behind, to ensure that ‘Every woman, every newborn, everywhere has the right to good quality care.’

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This video is from the free online course:

The Lancet Maternal Health Series: Global Research and Evidence

London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine