Skip to 0 minutes and 7 secondsMICHAEL ANDERSON: Hello, and welcome to week 5.

Skip to 0 minutes and 9 secondsPAULA KELLY: This week, we explore some methods to help divide decimals and fractions without the use of a calculator. The aim is to use some methods which help to develop understanding.

Skip to 0 minutes and 19 secondsMICHAEL ANDERSON: As we go through each step, you'll find a range of examples as well as questions for you to try yourself. We've also linked to some traditional classroom-based resources you may wish to explore in your own teaching.

Skip to 0 minutes and 31 secondsPAULA KELLY: Don't forget to join the discussion. Post your answers, thoughts, and questions in the sections below each step.

Dividing with decimals and fractions

Last week we started to bring together the course to help us address worded questions. We used equivalent fractions, added and subtracted fractions and compared the relative size of numbers expressed as fractions, decimals or percentages.

This week we explore methods to help divide decimals and fractions without the use of as calculator. The aim is to use methods which develop understanding. As we go through each step you will consider a range of examples and attempt some questions yourself. You can join the discussion by posting your answers, thoughts and questions in the sections below each step

Download this week’s accompanying worksheet of questions.

Starter problem

This week we’re giving you the chance to set your own starter problem. You can combine fractions, decimals and percentages in any way you like, but you must have at least three numbers. You can use whatever operators you wish (addition, subtraction, multiplication and division), but must use at least two different operators.

You may like to set your problem in a real-life context or require students to use mathematical skills met in other topics such as geometry. We’ll look at this more at the end of this week.

Post your starter problem into the comments below. Then during the week, we’d like you to return to your own starter problem, or even attempt another learner’s starter problems.

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This video is from the free online course:

Maths Subject Knowledge: Fractions, Decimals, and Percentages

National STEM Learning Centre