Acknowledgements and further reading

We would make a special thanks to the experts who contributed to our course, and provided great insights into the issues we have talked about:

• Fulvia Memisoglu, University of Oxford, UK and Çukurova University, Turkey

• Katharina Lenner, University of Bath, UK

• Lilian Tsourdi, University of Oxford, UK

• Philip Martin, University of California, Davis, United States

• Tanja Bastia, University of Manchester, UK

• Marie McAuliffe, International Organization for Migration, Switzerland

Further readings

If you want to dig deeper into some of the ideas and cases we have developed in the course, you can consult the following references, which we have referred to and drawn on during the last three weeks:

Cerruti, M. (2009) ‘Gender and Intra-Regional Migration in South America’, United Nations Development Programme Research Paper 2009/12.

European Migration Network (2012) ‘Asylum and Migration Glossary. A tool for better comparability 2.0’, European Commission Publication

ICMPD (2015) ‘Targetting Vulnerabilities: the impact of the Syrian War and refugee situation on trafficking in persons. A study of Syria, Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan and Iraq.’ International Centre for Migration Policy Development (ICMPD) Report.

IOM (2011) ‘Glossary on Migration’. International Organization for Migration, Geneva.

Phillips, J. and Spinks, H. (2013) ‘Boat arrivals in Australia since 1976’, Parliament of Australia Research Paper.

Triandafyllidou, A. (2013) ‘Migration policy in Southern Europe: Challenges, constraints and prospects’ in ‘A Strategy for Southern Europe’, LSE Special Report, pp. 54-63.

Tsourdi, E. and de Bruycker, P. (2015) ‘EU Asylum Policy: In search of solidarity and access to protection’, Policy Brief, Migration Policy Centre, EUI

UN Office of the High Commissioner of Human Rights (2017) ‘Interviews with Rohingyas fleeing from Myanmar since 9 October 2016’, Report of OHCR mission to Bangladesh

Zong, J and Batalova, J (2016) ‘Mexican immigrants in the United States’, Migration Information Source (Online Journal of the Migration Policy Institute).

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This article is from the free online course:

Why Do People Migrate? Facts

European University Institute (EUI)