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Skip to 0 minutes and 5 secondsMELANIA TUDORICA: As you may remember, we saw Anna in pain during her run. It looked like she had very bad cramps. Let's find out how she's doing.

Skip to 0 minutes and 15 secondsANNA: Hi, this is Anna. I would like to make an appointment with my GP.

Skip to 0 minutes and 21 secondsYeah. When running this morning I had really bad cramps. I was nauseous and lightheaded still. OK. My date of birth is 8 March 1992. Last name, Petersen. All right. I will be there. Thank you. Bye.

Skip to 0 minutes and 47 secondsGP: Anna, I heard you had pains in your abdomen during running. Could you explain to me exactly how that went?

Skip to 0 minutes and 54 secondsANNA: I went running, and suddenly I had really bad cramps. I still don't feel OK. I'm very nauseous and lightheaded. I don't know what's wrong.

Skip to 1 minute and 3 secondsGP: OK. In that regard, I would like to check your temperature and your heart rate. Yes.

Skip to 1 minute and 14 secondsYou have an elevated heart rate and also a bit of a temperature.

Skip to 1 minute and 17 secondsANNA: Ah. Ah.

Skip to 1 minute and 19 secondsGP: What are you feeling?

Skip to 1 minute and 20 secondsANNA: I don't know. It's like something is stabbing me in the stomach.

Skip to 1 minute and 25 secondsGP: When's the last time you had your period, if I may ask?

Skip to 1 minute and 29 secondsANNA: I don't know. I've been so busy.

Skip to 1 minute and 31 secondsGP: Might there be a possibility that you're pregnant?

Skip to 1 minute and 35 secondsANNA: It might be. I don't know.

Skip to 1 minute and 37 secondsGP: We could run a few tests just to make sure.

Skip to 1 minute and 40 secondsANNA: OK. Let's do it.

Skip to 1 minute and 41 secondsGP: And we'll return to that later.

Skip to 1 minute and 47 secondsSo, Anna, I think congratulations are in order.

Skip to 1 minute and 49 secondsANNA: Thank you. But I'm still a little bit in shock.

Skip to 1 minute and 52 secondsGP: Yeah. And as regards your elevated heart rate and your temperature, I think it's wise if you meet the gynaecologist. They will do some further tests just to make sure. And I'm writing you a reference letter.

Skip to 2 minutes and 20 secondsIf you pass this on to the gynaecologist they will know everything they need to know.

Skip to 2 minutes and 31 secondsANNA: Thank you so much.

Skip to 2 minutes and 32 secondsGP: Take care, Anna.

Skip to 2 minutes and 41 secondsRECEPTIONIST: Hi.

Skip to 2 minutes and 42 secondsANNA: Hi.

Skip to 2 minutes and 42 secondsRECEPTIONIST: How can we help you?

Skip to 2 minutes and 44 secondsANNA: Hi, I'm Anna. I've got a reference letter from my GP.

Skip to 2 minutes and 48 secondsRECEPTIONIST: OK. Do you have a hospital card already from this hospital?

Skip to 2 minutes and 52 secondsANNA: No, I don't have one.

Skip to 2 minutes and 54 secondsRECEPTIONIST: OK. I'm going to make one for you. Do you have insurance cards and an ID card with you?

Skip to 3 minutes and 0 secondsANNA: Let me look.

Skip to 3 minutes and 6 secondsRECEPTIONIST: And are registered to you.

Skip to 3 minutes and 7 secondsANNA: Thank you.

Skip to 3 minutes and 23 secondsRECEPTIONIST: OK. Very good.

Skip to 3 minutes and 31 secondsThis is the patient card you need. Every time you visit here at the hospital you need these cards. Here you are.

Skip to 3 minutes and 40 secondsANNA: Thank you so much.

Skip to 3 minutes and 41 secondsRECEPTIONIST: OK. If you come here around the corner, you go straight ahead, then you see number 10. There you have to go for your appointment.

Skip to 3 minutes and 48 secondsANNA: OK. Thank you so much.

Skip to 3 minutes and 50 secondsRECEPTIONIST: You're welcome.

Skip to 3 minutes and 50 secondsANNA: OK. Bye.

Skip to 3 minutes and 50 secondsRECEPTIONIST: Bye.

Skip to 3 minutes and 55 secondsANNA: Hey.

Skip to 3 minutes and 56 secondsRECEPTIONIST: Hi.

Skip to 3 minutes and 56 secondsANNA: I have an appointment here.

Skip to 3 minutes and 58 secondsRECEPTIONIST: Oh, let me see.

Skip to 4 minutes and 3 secondsCHANTAL: Hey, oi.

Skip to 4 minutes and 4 secondsANNA: Hi.

Skip to 4 minutes and 6 secondsRECEPTIONIST: Here's your card back. The doctor will be with you in one moment. You can take a seat over there.

Skip to 4 minutes and 12 secondsANNA: OK. Thank you.

Skip to 4 minutes and 16 secondsTRIX: You work as a medical assistant at the gynaecology department. Our friend Anna came in earlier and we saw that she startled when she saw you. Are you acquainted?

Skip to 4 minutes and 23 secondsCHANTAL: Yes, we're neighbours.

Skip to 4 minutes and 25 secondsTRIX: And do you run into friends and acquaintances more often?

Skip to 4 minutes and 27 secondsCHANTAL: Pretty often, yes. It's an open clinic.

Skip to 4 minutes and 30 secondsTRIX: What did you think when you saw Anna?

Skip to 4 minutes and 32 secondsCHANTAL: I think she's pregnant. It's pretty common when people come in here.

Skip to 4 minutes and 35 secondsTRIX: And how do you handle this type of situation? Can you share with others outside work that you saw Anna and think she's pregnant?

Skip to 4 minutes and 41 secondsCHANTAL: Absolutely not. We don't share anything. We are bound by an oath. We have the same confidentiality as the doctors. And I wouldn't even think about sharing her personal information she shares with us.

Skip to 4 minutes and 54 secondsTRIX: And do you have access to Anna's patient files if you wind up treating her?

Skip to 4 minutes and 58 secondsCHANTAL: If I wanted to, yes, I can access her files. But everything is registered so they will find out who's in her file. And it can have pretty big consequences if I do that without any good reason.

Skip to 5 minutes and 14 secondsDOCTOR: Well, twin pregnancy. Congratulations. This is the one baby and this is the other one.

Skip to 5 minutes and 20 secondsANNA: Yeah. Thank you so much. I'm still a little bit in shock. I mean, pregnant with twins.

Skip to 5 minutes and 26 secondsDOCTOR: It's exciting and it's double the fun. It's worth the effort. Regarding the cramps that you came in with, these are normal in pregnancy, especially during exercise. I would advise you to take it a bit easy. And enjoy your pregnancy and get prepared for those twins. Is there anything else I can do for you?

Skip to 5 minutes and 47 secondsANNA: Well, I just saw my neighbour, Chantal. I believe she's an assistant here. I don't like anybody to know yet that I'm pregnant. So--

Skip to 5 minutes and 55 secondsDOCTOR: Yeah, I can imagine. There is patient-doctor secrecy. And that doesn't only apply to me, but also with our other staff members. So she won't talk about it unless you tell her that you're pregnant and that she's allowed to talk about it. So don't worry about it.

Skip to 6 minutes and 11 secondsANNA: OK. That's a relief. Thank you.

Skip to 6 minutes and 13 secondsDOCTOR: Good. I will send a letter to your GP with a plan for the pregnancy. So everyone is informed about pregnancy and everyone knows what to do.

Skip to 6 minutes and 23 secondsANNA: OK. Thank you so much.

Skip to 6 minutes and 25 secondsDOCTOR: OK. See you later.

Skip to 6 minutes and 27 secondsMELANIA TUDORICA: Congratulations Anna. As you saw in this video, a lot of data was used and shared during Anna's medical voyage. Her GP has a lot of information about her and he needs to share this with his colleagues at the hospital. This way, Anna will get the medical attention she needs. Your doctor also has this much data about you whether you are aware of this or not. But what exactly is personal data? As you have learned in the previous steps, the GDPR determines what personal data entails and how it should be treated. According to Article 4, personal data is any information that can help to identify you as a person.

Skip to 7 minutes and 5 secondsAs you saw in Anna's case, she was identified by her GP by combining her last name with her date of birth. This means that this data helps to identify Anna as a person. And therefore, this is personal data. The same goes for health data. In the GDPR this is referred to as data concerning health, which is any personal data that reveals information about your health status. The results of Anna's ultrasound, for example, is definitely data concerning health. But not only information which falls under the doctor-patient relationship falls under this definition. The definition is very broad. The GDPR furthermore determines that data concerning health is a special category, which is also referred to as sensitive data.

Skip to 7 minutes and 48 secondsSensitive data gets more privacy protection because it could have a great impact on your life if this data were freely available. You will learn more about this in the next step.

What is health data?

In this video we follow Anna on her medical journey and explain some basic concepts based on her story. We see how many times she provides her healthcare providers with personal data which identify her as a person. Her General Practitioner for example identifies her by combining her date of birth and her last name. She also reveals her identity at the hospital reception and at the reception of the gynaecology department. Her doctors enter the data they collect from her by consulting with her and by doing various examinations in her medical file. These healthcare providers are bound by confidentiality as well as by data protection rules.

The General Data Protection Regulation determines what personal data entails and how it should be treated. Personal data is any information that can help to identify you as a person. In the GDPR health data is referred to as data concerning health, which is any personal data that reveals information about your health status. The result of Anna’s ultrasound for example is data concerning health. But not only information which falls under the doctor-patient relationship falls under this definition. The definition is very broad. The GDPR furthermore determines that data concerning health is a special category, which is also referred to as sensitive data.

Sensitive data gets more privacy protection, because it could have a great impact on your life if this data were freely available. We would like to know what your thoughts are on this. How could Anna’s life be impacted if her health data were freely available? Feel free to discuss this with other learners on the discussion board.

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This video is from the free online course:

Protecting Health Data in the Modern Age: Getting to Grips with the GDPR

University of Groningen

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