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Skip to 0 minutes and 15 secondsSo so far, we've been looking at, what is a literature review, and gathering lots of information. We've been thinking about the literature as information, though. This week, we're going to shift gears a little bit and think about what you're doing with that information. We're thinking about the dramatic story, the exciting, interesting story that you're going to tell with all of that literature. What is it that drives a really good literature review? It's lots of questions-- questions that help you think about what you're reading.

Skip to 0 minutes and 48 secondsSo we're going to be exploring concept mapping as a way of sketching out a whole discussion; getting a sense of, what's the story you're trying to tell; outlining it before we go into filling in the details next week. Most importantly this week, we're going to be matching the readings that you've collected with specific questions so that you're clear what each of those readings is actually helping you answer and discuss. So by the end of this week, you should have a much better idea of what a research story is, what a critical discussion of the literature is, and where you're going with the story you are trying to tell. Let's go.

Preview of Week 3

“Everything we know has its origins in questions” (Postman, 1976)

The past two weeks have been preparing for now. You’ve been doing lots of reading, putting together a professionally formatted bibliography, and adding annotations to key items in your reading list. You’ve talked about what you’re reading and thinking, and I hope it’s been interesting for you. Now we move to the heart of the matter in developing your review, and as we get into the guts of the literature review, the fun starts.

Conversation starter

  • Do you have a specific question already, to drive your research?

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This video is from the free online course:

Research Writing: How to Do a Literature Review

University of Wollongong