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This content is taken from the The University of Glasgow & The University of the West Indies's online course, History of Slavery in the British Caribbean. Join the course to learn more.

Meet the team

Profile pics of whole teamTop (left to right): Dr. Peggy Brunache, Dr. Christine Whyte, Dr. Sally Tuckett, Dr. Jelmer Vos
Bottom (left to right): Dr. Zachary J.M. Beier, Dr. Tara Inniss, Dr. Shani Roper, Annalee Davis

Dr. Peggy Brunache

I am a lecturer in the history of Atlantic slavery at the University of Glasgow. I also serve as the newly appointed Director of the university’s Beniba Centre for Slavery Studies. Born in Miami to Haitian parents, I trained and worked as an historical archaeologist with a focus on slave plantation studies, the African diaspora, and the transatlantic slave trade, working on archaeological projects in Benin, West Africa, Guadeloupe, and various sites in the United States.

Dr. Christine Whyte

I am a lecturer in global history at the University of Glasgow. I work on the end of the slave trade and slavery in West Africa, particularly Sierra Leone and Liberia. I’m interested in the history of children and childhoods.

Dr. Sally Tuckett

I am a lecturer in dress and textile histories at the University of Glasgow. I’m a social historian who uses the study of dress and textiles as a way to access the past.

Dr. Jelmer Vos

I am a Lecturer in Global History at University of Glasgow, with special interests in the history of the Atlantic slave trade & histories of commodity production & consumption in Africa.

Dr. Zachary J.M. Beier

I am a Lecturer in the Department of History and Archaeology and the Director of the Archaeology Laboratory at The University of the West Indies, Mona in Kingston, Jamaica. My research focuses on the archaeology and heritage of the Caribbean at both prehistoric and historical sites, and, principally, the diversity of human encounters in the emergent modern world. Along with teaching courses in archaeology and heritage studies, I am currently engaged in a variety of archaeological projects across Jamaica.

Dr. Tara Inniss

I am a lecturer and Heritage Studies Coordinator at The University of the West Indies, Cave Hill Campus, Barbados. I also serve as Director for the UWI/ OAS Caribbean Heritage Network (CHN). I share a commitment to using history and heritage to create representative spaces for interpretation and participation in the Caribbean. The areas of focus for my teaching and research are the history of medicine; history of social policy; and heritage and social development.

Dr. Shani Roper

I am Shani Roper, Historian and Curator of the University of the West Indies Museum. My research interests are in Caribbean childhoods, museums education and pedagogies of history education. I believe that museums stand at the intersection of community development and an empowering and subversive educational experience.

Annalee Davis

I am a visual artist, cultural instigator, educator, and writer. I work at the intersection of biography and history, focusing on post-plantation economies by engaging with a particular landscape on Barbados. My studio, located on a working dairy farm, operated historically as a 17th-century sugarcane plantation, offering a critical context for my practice by engaging with the residue of the plantation.

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Partnership

The partnership between The University of the West Indies (UWI) and the University of Glasgow (UofG) stems from a historic Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) signed in 2019. Framed as a “Reparatory Justice” initiative, this MOU agreement led to the two universities co-establishing a Glasgow-Caribbean Centre for Development Research (GCCDR). As part of the work of the GCCDR both universities will be jointly offering a Master of Arts Programme in Reparatory Justice. The UWI/UofG alliance facilitates a new opportunity to address the legacies of slavery and colonialism in the British Caribbean through teaching, research and public awareness programmes.

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This article is from the free online course:

History of Slavery in the British Caribbean

The University of Glasgow