Peer feedback

Peers can be very helpful with providing informal suggestions for your development, particularly if they have experienced similar situations. A peer might be another STEM Ambassador or a person who has experience of volunteering in other settings.

They can give you the benefit of their experience and give you non-judgemental feedback. If they were at a volunteering activity they will be able to give you direct feedback. If they were not, you will need to describe the scenario or circumstances to them in order to get feedback. One suggested approach is that you used the questions from the self-reflection tool (Word doc) which we introduced in a previous step as the basis for a dialogue with one or more peers.

Some companies have groups of STEM Ambassadors (or other volunteers) and they organise meetings to discuss STEM volunteering activities on a regular basis. This can provide a useful forum to discuss how activities went and possible improvements for the future.

Another useful strategy for collaborating with peers is to jointly deliver STEM volunteering activities and help and support each other.

For STEM Ambassadors, STEM Learning supports an online community group where you can share ideas and comments. Online groups like these are particularly useful for keeping in touch if you volunteer independently or in remote locations. If you are not a STEM Ambassador in the UK, you may find other online groups meet your needs.

Comment

What is the value of volunteering with others and how useful is peer feedback to you? In the comments below share your responses to these questions.

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This article is from the free online course:

Inspiring Young People In STEM: Using Feedback to Improve

National STEM Learning Centre