Want to keep learning?

This content is taken from the National STEM Learning Centre's online course, Teaching Primary Science: Chemistry. Join the course to learn more.

Skip to 0 minutes and 8 secondsSPEAKER 1: What misconceptions can you spot?

Skip to 0 minutes and 10 secondsSPEAKER 2: OK then year four. So you have got a selection of different things here. You need to classify them and see which you think is a solid, liquid, or gas. Which belongs in which group? So have a look at each of the things and see what you think.

Skip to 0 minutes and 27 secondsEDWARD: Can we stand up?

Skip to 0 minutes and 28 secondsSPEAKER 2: Yeah, you can stand up. Have a look.

Skip to 0 minutes and 31 secondsEDWARD: So Coca-Cola is probably going to be in the liquid because you can drink it.

Skip to 0 minutes and 38 secondsFRASER: And jelly is a liquid and a solid kind of. Because if it was originally made from liquid, and then turned into like a solid, then it could be both of them.

Skip to 0 minutes and 53 secondsSPEAKER 5: That's a liquid.

Skip to 0 minutes and 54 secondsFRASER: Those cubes-- that's solid. Those cubes-- that's solid.

Skip to 0 minutes and 59 secondsSPEAKER 7: Yeah, cause--

Skip to 1 minute and 0 secondsSPEAKER 2: Why?

Skip to 1 minute and 1 secondFRASER: Because you can't drink them. [LAUGHTER] They're not floating around like gas, or-- because you can hold that, and you can bang it, and it'll make like a sound. So it's also plastic. So it's solid.

Skip to 1 minute and 17 secondsSPEAKER 7: Yeah, solid.

Skip to 1 minute and 18 secondsSPEAKER 2: OK.

Skip to 1 minute and 19 secondsEDWARD: And that should go in liquid.

Skip to 1 minute and 22 secondsSPEAKER 8: Yeah.

Skip to 1 minute and 23 secondsSPEAKER 2: How'd you know? There, have a good look at it. Have to look at it properly. [INTERPOSING VOICES] Yeah, open it. [INTERPOSING VOICES]

Skip to 1 minute and 29 secondsEVY: Then if we pour it a little--

Skip to 1 minute and 37 secondsSPEAKER 8: Ugh. [LAUGHING]

Skip to 1 minute and 41 secondsSPEAKER 8: Yeah, it's--

Skip to 1 minute and 46 secondsIt's quite liquidy.

Skip to 1 minute and 47 secondsEVY: But it looks like a little bit-- it looks a little bit solid as well.

Skip to 1 minute and 57 secondsSPEAKER 2: What's making you think that, Evy?

Skip to 1 minute and 59 secondsEVY: Because sometimes it didn't move.

Skip to 2 minutes and 4 secondsSPEAKER 8: That is very squidgy, but it's kind of solid as well. Because it states in its place.

Skip to 2 minutes and 9 secondsEDWARD: It feels a bit wet though.

Skip to 2 minutes and 11 secondsSPEAKER 2: Does it? Why don't you all have a feel, and then touch your fingers.

Skip to 2 minutes and 16 secondsEDWARD: It does feel wet.

Skip to 2 minutes and 18 secondsSPEAKER 8: Yeah.

Skip to 2 minutes and 20 secondsEVY: Yeah, and it's cold.

Skip to 2 minutes and 22 secondsSPEAKER 2: OK.

Skip to 2 minutes and 24 secondsSPEAKER 8: But it also stays in its place.

Skip to 2 minutes and 27 secondsSPEAKER 2: What about when you squash it though? [LAUGHING]

Skip to 2 minutes and 32 secondsEVY: I think we should put this one in not sure.

Skip to 2 minutes and 36 secondsSPEAKER 2: What about the sand then? You've got that in not sure. Where do we think that one should go?

Skip to 2 minutes and 41 secondsFRASER: I think it's a liquid.

Skip to 2 minutes and 48 secondsBecause it's a liquid because you can pour it, and normally solids won't do that. So it's probably a liquid.

Skip to 3 minutes and 1 secondSPEAKER 2: What about this one then? I think it's jelly. Where are we going to put that?

Skip to 3 minutes and 8 secondsEDWARD: I think liquid.

Skip to 3 minutes and 9 secondsSPEAKER 2: You think it's a liquid, Edward? Why do you think that one is a liquid?

Skip to 3 minutes and 14 secondsEDWARD: Well, it feels wet.

Skip to 3 minutes and 15 secondsSPEAKER 2: Yeah.

Skip to 3 minutes and 17 secondsEDWARD: Yeah.

Skip to 3 minutes and 18 secondsEVY: I think it's a liquid as well because it starts off as a gelatin. And that's a bit liquidy.

Skip to 3 minutes and 28 secondsSPEAKER 2: OK. What do you have to add to it? Do you know how you make it?

Skip to 3 minutes and 32 secondsEVY: Water.

Skip to 3 minutes and 33 secondsSPEAKER 2: OK, and water-- what do we think water is?

Skip to 3 minutes and 36 secondsFRASER: And you have to freeze it. Water turns into ice.

Skip to 3 minutes and 40 secondsSPEAKER 2: OK.

Skip to 3 minutes and 40 secondsFRASER: Ice is a solid.

Skip to 3 minutes and 42 secondsSPEAKER 2: OK. So Fraser thinks it might be a solid. We think liquid over here. Sereah and Jude, what do you think?

Skip to 3 minutes and 49 secondsSPEAKER 5: I think it's going to be a liquid.

Skip to 3 minutes and 51 secondsSPEAKER 2: OK. Why do you think it's going to be a liquid?

Skip to 3 minutes and 54 secondsSPEAKER 5: Well, when you feel jelly, it's really soft and wet. And jelly is made out of water.

Skip to 4 minutes and 1 secondSPEAKER 2: OK, Jude, what do you think?

Skip to 4 minutes and 3 secondsJUDE: I think it's a solid and a liquid. Because it starts off as a liquid, and then it turns into a solid. And if you hit something at it, it went up and break into pieces.

Skip to 4 minutes and 16 secondsSPEAKER 2: OK. So then there's just the Coca-Cola left we haven't discussed. What are our thoughts on that one? [INTERPOSING VOICES] What happened when you poured it?

Skip to 4 minutes and 28 secondsSPEAKER 5: Well, when we poured it, it fizzed.

Skip to 4 minutes and 30 secondsFRASER: It stopped and fizzed-- fizzing.

Skip to 4 minutes and 34 secondsJUDE: Well, it's the gas.

Skip to 4 minutes and 36 secondsSPEAKER 5: It's the gas coming up.

Skip to 4 minutes and 39 secondsEVY: And inside--

Skip to 4 minutes and 41 secondsFRASER: It's mainly--

Skip to 4 minutes and 45 secondsEVY: Like if it's a fizzy drink, it will be made of carbon dioxide. Because it needs to bubble. So I think carbon dioxide is a gas. So I think it could be a gas.

Skip to 5 minutes and 2 secondsSPEAKER 2: OK.

Skip to 5 minutes and 3 secondsFRASER: I think it's a liquid because you can pour it just like the sand. and it's mainly And you can drink it. And it's mainly liquid.

Skip to 5 minutes and 22 secondsSPEAKER 2: OK.

Typical misconceptions about states of matter

In the video the children are having a conversation about what they understand about solids, liquids and gases. Use this video as an opportunity to practice identifying misconceptions children may have about states of matter.

Analyse

Watch the video. Can you spot the misconceptions that the children have?

Share this video:

This video is from the free online course:

Teaching Primary Science: Chemistry

National STEM Learning Centre