Want to keep learning?

This content is taken from the King's College London's online course, Understanding ADHD: Current Research and Practice. Join the course to learn more.

Opportunity to take part in research; Part 1

As you know, this course is run by Psycholgists and we’re always keen to carry out research. Please read the following and consider taking part.

Title of study

Understanding ADHD MOOC evaluation; Part 1. Ethics ID; 18375; King’s College, London

Invitation Paragraph

I would like to invite you to participate in this research project. Before you decide whether you want to take part, it is important for you to understand why the research is being done and what your participation will involve. Please take time to read the following information carefully and discuss it with others if you wish. Ask me if there is anything that is not clear or if you would like more information.

What is the purpose of the study?

The purpose of the study is to evaluate this MOOC and to understand more about the psychology of our learners. We have two parts to this. Part 1 begins before you begin the course content and Part 2 will take place once you have completed the course content, in week 4.

Why have I been invited to take part?

You are being invited to participate in this study because you are enrolled on the Understanding ADHD MOOC.

What will happen if I take part?

If you agree to take part you will complete two surveys anonymously - one now and one when you finish the course. The surveys will ask questions about your knowledge of ADHD, views towards science and more general psychological questions about yourself. The survey will take around 15 minutes to complete.

Do I have to take part?

Participation is completely voluntary. You should only take part if you want to and choosing not to take part will not disadvantage you in anyway. By completing the questionnaires, you will be giving consent to take part and for your anonymous data being used for the purposes explained.

You are free to withdraw at any point during completion of the survey, without having to give a reason and your decision to take part or not will not affect your eligibility for a participation certificate. Similarly, withdrawing from the study will not affect you in any way. Once you submit the survey, it will no longer be possible to withdraw from the study because the data will be fully anonymous. Please do not include any personal identifiable information in your responses.

Data handling and confidentiality

This research is anonymous. This means that nobody, including the researchers, will be aware of your identity, and that nobody will be able to connect you to the answers you provide, even indirectly. Your answers will nevertheless be treated confidentially and the information you provide will not allow you to be identified in any research outputs/publications. Your data will be held securely at King’s College, London on a private archive on our network until the research is completed.

The data controller for this project will be King’s College London (KCL). Research is a task that the University carries out in the public interest. Your data will be processed in accordance with the standards set by the General Data Protection Regulation 2016 (GDPR).

What will happen to the results of the study?

The results of the study will be summarised in academic journal articles. Copies of which will be made available upon request.

Who should I contact for further information?

If you have any questions or require more information about this study, please contact me using the following contact details:

mark.kennedy@kcl.ac.uk

What if I have further questions, or if something goes wrong?

If this study has harmed you in any way or if you wish to make a complaint about the conduct of the study you can contact King’s College London using the details below for further advice and information:

The Chair, MRA-19/20-18375, rec@kcl.ac.uk

Thank you for reading this information sheet and for considering taking part in this research.

Share this article:

This article is from the free online course:

Understanding ADHD: Current Research and Practice

King's College London

Get a taste of this course

Find out what this course is like by previewing some of the course steps before you join: