Skip to 0 minutes and 11 secondsAUDREY PROST: Hello, my name is Audrey Prost. Welcome to the final week of this course. In previous weeks, we have learned a lot about how to improve the health of women, children, and adolescents at different stages of the life cycle. This week, we'll connect the stages of the life cycle back together and learn about the importance of going beyond survival to improve women's, children's, and adolescents' health. All-cause mortality is falling around the world. In low and middle income countries, deaths from infectious diseases have decreased but non-communicable diseases are on the rise. The global health agenda remains focused on preventing avoidable deaths.

Skip to 0 minutes and 48 secondsBut there is sufficient change to ask whether those who survive can live healthily without disability and contribute more fully to society and the economy. The global health strategy for women's, children's, and adolescents' health has three components-- survive, thrive, and transform. Thrive and transform explicitly encourage us to think beyond survival. How can we help women, children, and adolescents reach their full potential? What kinds of enabling transformations must happen for them to thrive? Some examples might include better access to quality education, gender equity, and freedom from violence. The thrive and transform agendas encourage us to think about broader development challenges that affect health too. For example, urbanisation-- the fact that around two and three of us will live in cities by 2050.

Skip to 1 minute and 41 secondsAnd broader environmental change-- the ways in which climate change and its drivers are affecting health and nutrition. In the second part of the week, we'll discuss examples of cross-cutting development challenges that affect women, children, and adolescents across the life cycle. This includes violence against women, a human rights and public health crisis of gigantic proportions. With Joyce Wamoyi and Heidi Stoeckl, we'll learn that violence against women and girls affects health and human potential at all stages of the life cycle and requires action at multiple levels. Another cross cutting challenge we'll focus on is how to feed nearly 10 billion people by 2050 in the context of climate change and urbanisation.

Skip to 2 minutes and 26 secondsWith Alan Dangour we'll learn how climate change, pressure on land, and changing diets are changing both the availability and quality of foods we can access with profound implications for women's, children's, and adolescents' health. Finally, we'll take a look at data gaps for multi sexual initiatives. And at funding to close the financing gap for women's, children, and adolescent health. By the end of this week, you'll be able to discuss the importance of actions that promote health beyond survival, identify cross-cutting development challenges to women's, children's, and adolescent health, and discuss funding for them in the SDG era.

Skip to 3 minutes and 5 secondsAs we work through the content of this final week of the course, we want to hear your views and look forward to the conversation we'll have together.

Welcome to Week 6

Welcome to Week 6 of the course, titled ‘Putting Women and Children’s Health Together’. I am Audrey Prost, together with Professor Joy Lawn, I will be leading the final week of the course.

Over the past five weeks we have learned a great deal about how to improve the health of newborns, children, adolescents and women. This week we are going to step back from the detail of the individuals, and frame women’s, children’s, and adolescent’s health in the context of the current global health agenda.

What will we learn?

By the end of this week you should be able to:

  • Discuss the importance of actions that promote health beyond survival
  • Identify cross cutting development challenges in women's, children's, and adolescent's health
  • Discuss funding and data gaps for women's, children's, and adolescent's health in the Sustainable Development Goal era

Structure and content

Here we discuss how the Global Strategy for Women’s, Children’s, and Adolescent’s Health will take us beyond survival to thriving and transforming, to allow people to live healthily without disability and contribute to economy. In the second part of the week we will look at how health at themes that cut across the lifecycle and different sectors. Finally, we will look at the data and financing gaps for women’s, children’s, and adolescents health in the Sustainable Development Goal era.

As we work through these themes it will be interesting to hear your views. I look forward to the conversations we can have together!

This image shows the MARCH lifecycle as a circle with three parts - Adolescents, moving through to Births, moving through to Children, which then joins back up with Adolescents

The MARCH lifecycle

Share this video:

This video is from the free online course:

Improving the Health of Women, Children and Adolescents: from Evidence to Action

London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine