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Skip to 0 minutes and 13 secondsTANYA MARCHANT: Welcome to week two. My name is Tanya Marchant, and I'm a senior lecturer in epidemiology at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. And I'm the leader for this week of the course, Reproductive Health-- Every Birth Wanted. Reproductive health is a very large topic. We have chosen to focus in depth on making every birth wanted. We'll be sharing insights into how making every birth wanted affects health right across the life cycle from birth to childhood, adolescent stage, and into adulthood. We will discuss the demand for availability of and use of contraceptive methods around the world and reflect on how the subject has moved from being a global health topic to a global health priority today.

Skip to 1 minute and 6 secondsBy the end of this week, learners should be able to recognise where making every birth wanted fits within the framework of reproductive health, understand why increasing access to safe contraception is a global health priority, and evaluate the evidence on contraceptive use around the world. And further, we'll aim to discuss ways in which social, economic, religious, and political factors influence use. We're going to start the week by looking at a framework for reproductive health as a whole, and look at where contraception fits within that framework and take time to explain abortion and contraception within that.

Skip to 1 minute and 50 secondsWe'll also unpack the evidence to support the use of contraception to save the lives of people around the world, and then look at the latest data on how many people are accessing contraceptives and how many people still don't have their needs met. Using examples, we'll be illustrating how delivering safe abortion and contraceptive methods are influenced by political and social factors. We'll close the week with a case study from Ethiopia, a country that has made rapid progress with regards to meeting the needs of its people for contraceptive access. And we'll be asking learners to reflect on the drivers of change there and to think about what else needs to be done.

Skip to 2 minutes and 39 secondsI hope you enjoy the week, and I look forward to hearing your views as we work through it.

Welcome to Week 2

Welcome to Week 2 of the course, titled Reproductive Health: Every Birth Wanted. I’m Dr Tanya Marchant, the course’s Lead Educator, and I’ll be leading this week of the course.

Reproductive health is a very large, cross-cutting topic with a vast range of current issues. We have chosen to concentrate on what it means to make every birth wanted, sharing insight into how this affects those at the centre of other weeks of the course: the newborn, child, adolescent, and woman. We will focus on the availability, use, and demand for different methods of contraception: a topic that has long been on the global health agenda, and is increasingly a global health priority.

What will we learn?

By the end of this week you should be able to:

  • Recognise where ‘making every birth wanted’ fits within the framework of reproductive health
  • Understand why increasing access to safe contraception is a global health priority
  • Evaluate the evidence on contraceptive use around the world
  • Discuss ways in which social, economic, religious and political factors influence use.

Structure and content

The week begins by thinking about where ‘making every birth wanted’ fits within the framework of reproductive health as a whole, considering contraception and induced abortion in particular. We then look at what the evidence tells us about the life-saving potential of contraceptive use, at who is using contraception today, which methods are being used, and how many people continue to have an unmet need for contraception.

The next activities explore some of the factors that influence whether people’s needs are met or not, with examples to illustrate how delivering safe abortion and contraceptive choice to individuals can be impacted by political and cultural issues.

The week ends with a case study of Ethiopia, a country that has recently achieved rapid progress in meeting the needs of its population with regards to contraception access. A discussion will ask you to reflect on the key drivers of change in the country and what is still to be achieved.

I hope you enjoy the week!

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This video is from the free online course:

Improving the Health of Women, Children and Adolescents: from Evidence to Action

London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

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