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Skip to 0 minutes and 13 secondsVERONIQUE FILIPPI: Welcome to Week 3. I'm Dr. Veronique Filippi at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. I'm a reader in epidemiology and maternal health. In this week, we are going to consider why maternal health is a global health priority, which has been recognised in the Millennium Development Goals. And while a lot of progress has been made in reducing maternal mortality, there's still a lot more that could be done. By the end of the this week, learners should be able to recognise why maternal health is a priority and why women in low-income countries are so much at risk of dying during pregnancy, childbirths, and after childbirths.

Skip to 0 minutes and 59 secondsThey should be able to evaluate the key strategies that should be put in place in order to reduce maternal mortality. And finally, they should be able to identify future priorities in maternal health in order to improve survival further. So we start with the week by looking at the definition of maternal mortality and morbidity, why women die and when. And we will be looking at the determinants of maternal mortality and morbidity in a poor resource setting. We will continue by looking at what we have learned in terms of strategies that work in reducing maternal death and maternal morbidity from a range of perspectives, putting a bit more focus on skilled birth attendants and emergency obstetric care.

Skip to 2 minutes and 0 secondsThen we will do a session looking at the future of maternal health, looking at quality of care from the perspective of the mother as well as from the perspective of the provider. We will finish the week with a case study identifying all the determinants of maternal mortality and how we could stop the death occurring at different points in the pathway from the time the woman gets pregnant to the time she needs to give birth. Then learners will have the opportunity to reflect further on what they have learned and how it applies to their country and their settings, looking at the various barriers and how they can be overcome.

Skip to 2 minutes and 51 secondsSome of the best minds at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and University College London have come together to prepare this course content. And we very much hope that you will enjoy the learning this week.

Welcome to Week 3

Welcome to Week 3 of the course, titled Maternal Health and Safe Motherhood. I’m Dr Veronique Filippi, a reader in maternal health and epidemiology at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and the leader for this week of the course.

This week will consider why the health of women during pregnancy, whilst giving birth and during the postnatal period is a global health priority. Improving maternal health has been one of the eight Millennium Development Goals, and while significant headway has been made to reduce levels of maternal mortality across the world, there are still many countries in which giving life can be dangerous.

What will we learn?

By the end of this week you should be able to:

  • Recognise why the health of mothers is so important
  • Evaluate key intervention strategies and their impact on levels of maternal mortality and morbidity
  • Identify future priorities for maternal health, in particular with respect to quality of care.

Structure and content

We’ll start the week by thinking about what we mean by maternal mortality and morbidity, and consider specific features of maternal health, such as how many women die, and when and why that happens.

The next activities will explore what the evidence tells us about our progress in saving mothers’ lives, what strategies are needed to increase those numbers further, and what we need to prioritise in the future.

We’ll close the week with a powerful case study on why mothers die, pulling together the issues raised in each activity. Learners will have the chance to reflect upon why expectant mothers don’t always receive the care they need, and apply their understanding to addressing how those barriers have and can continue to be removed for women across the world.

Some of the best minds at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and University College London have come together to prepare this week’s content. We very much hope you will enjoy this week!

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This video is from the free online course:

Improving the Health of Women, Children and Adolescents: from Evidence to Action

London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

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