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Examples of assigning competence

Examples of assigning competence
© Babcock Learning and Development Partnership LLP 2019. All rights reserved.
Example 1:
“The class were presented with a problem involving counting a large number of objects. There were lots of possibilities for ways to count them. Some children suggested counting in 1s, 2s or 5s. However, one pre-taught child (D) suggested counting in tens as ‘it is quicker’. So I decided to ask the class to try all the ideas so that they could notice that D’s idea is most useful. As a result the class decided that D’s idea was the best. The next day, with a similar problem the class decided to use D’s strategy of counting in tens.”
Example 2:
“After a pre-teach session, a pre-taught child (H) approached a group of children who were seeking adult support and offered to help them on the carpet. H gathered the resources that been had used in pre-teach and re-created the pre-teach session. Later when the children H had helped were now working on the task confidently I stopped the class and asked them – what had helped? One child said ‘After H explained how a protractor worked I understood how to measure the angles on the sheet.’”
Example 3:
“The children were sat in on tables with two perceived low status children but also one high status child. One of the pre taught girls (P) noticed that the perceived low status children were finding the concept difficult so, with no verbal prompting, she began to support them. Once this occurred, the other children in the group stopped what they were doing and began to listen to P so she had an audience of three other children. She mimicked my language from the pre-teach and used a mathematical diagram to explain her ideas. She even went as far as to invent a question for the child she was helping. Because I had noticed this conversation on the group’s table, when it was time to review the task, I asked the perceived high status child from that group to explain the drawing she had been using and she said, ‘I drew this because P used it to show my group what we were talking about.’”

Think about the lesson that followed one of your pre-teaching sessions and consider whether there were any opportunities to assign competence to any of your focus learners.

Comment and share below and don’t forget to capture your reflections in your journal too. We will revisit these examples in week 4 in more detail.

Example 1:

“The class were presented with a problem involving counting a large number of objects. There were lots of possibilities for ways to count them. Some children suggested counting in 1s, 2s or 5s. However, one pre-taught child (D) suggested counting in tens as ‘it is quicker’. So I decided to ask the class to try all the ideas so that they could notice that D’s idea is most useful. As a result the class decided that D’s idea was the best. The next day, with a similar problem the class decided to use D’s strategy of counting in tens.”
Example 2:
“After a pre-teach session, a pre-taught child (H) approached a group of children who were seeking adult support and offered to help them on the carpet. H gathered the resources that been had used in pre-teach and re-created the pre-teach session. Later when the children H had helped were now working on the task confidently I stopped the class and asked them – what had helped? One child said ‘After H explained how a protractor worked I understood how to measure the angles on the sheet.’”
Example 3:
“The children were sat in on tables with two perceived low status children but also one high status child. One of the pre taught girls (P) noticed that the perceived low status children were finding the concept difficult so, with no verbal prompting, she began to support them. Once this occurred, the other children in the group stopped what they were doing and began to listen to P so she had an audience of three other children. She mimicked my language from the pre-teach and used a mathematical diagram to explain her ideas. She even went as far as to invent a question for the child she was helping. Because I had noticed this conversation on the group’s table, when it was time to review the task, I asked the perceived high status child from that group to explain the drawing she had been using and she said, ‘I drew this because P used it to show my group what we were talking about.’”

Think about the lesson that followed one of your pre-teaching sessions and consider whether there were any opportunities to assign competence to any of your focus learners.

Comment and share below and don’t forget to capture your reflections in your journal too. We will revisit these examples in week 4 in more detail.

© Babcock Learning and Development Partnership LLP 2019. All rights reserved.
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