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Further reading on common phrases in Methods section

Reading recommendations and online resources in Methods seciton

Here, we will discuss the methodology section in research writing and explore common language structures and moves employed within it. This will be divided into four paragraphs.

Firstly, an overview of the methodology is essential to provide readers with a brief understanding of the study’s purpose and the data collection techniques employed. Authors may use phrases like “In this study” or “This investigation” to present the research aim or to specify the methods used for data collection, such as surveys or experiments.

The second move is to clarify the study’s aims and objectives. Authors can directly inform their readers of the research goals and what they intend to compare or identify. This helps to contextualize the study and set expectations for the outcomes presented in the following sections.

Thirdly, the methodology section should describe the participants or materials involved in the study. This information is typically presented in the past tense and often employs passive voice. Sentences such as “The sample consisted of 200 students” are common in this move. As you read more research articles, you will develop a better understanding of the common tenses and voices used to describe this type of information.

Lastly, authors may address other aspects of the methodology, including the location and conditions of the experiment, procedures, limitations, and data analysis techniques. It is essential to note that authors may combine different moves in one sentence or present the information in a mixed manner, depending on the study’s context and the need for conciseness.

In summary, understanding these common moves and language structures will help you analyze model articles and apply the knowledge to your own research writing.

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Deconstructing Research Articles: How to Read and Write a Research Paper

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