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Writing Effective Results-Driven Research Abstracts

When writing a research abstract, there are two main approaches: I.M.R.D. (Introduction, Method, Results, Discussion) and results-driven. The results-driven approach differs from the I.M.R.D. approach as it focuses on the results and objectives of the research and skips over the research background. In this article, we will explore the common features of results-driven abstracts, how to write them effectively, and the tenses and voices commonly used.

Common Features of Results-Driven Abstracts

In a results-driven abstract, the author skips the research background and starts directly with the research objectives, aims, and goals. Then, the author briefly covers the methods used and emphasizes the description of the results. Finally, the author provides a brief conclusion based on the results.

Sometimes, authors will combine different moves into one sentence to save space. For example, they may say “The goal of this research is to design a new approach using a certain method” to cover both the first move (objective) and the second move (briefly cover the method). This approach allows authors to meet the word count requirements of most abstracts, which are usually around 200 to 250 words.

Tenses and Voices Used in Results-Driven Abstracts

Authors commonly use present tense in results-driven abstracts to give readers a sense of the present and to emphasize that the results are generalizable and applicable even now. In addition, authors may choose to use either active or passive voice, depending on their preference and the nature of the research.

For example, an author may choose to use passive voice to describe a novel separator designed for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. The description may be lengthy, covering different desirable features of the separator, but the author will use passive voice to indicate that the goal and aim of the study is to design a new separator for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries.

Effective Writing Techniques for Results-Driven Abstracts

To write an effective results-driven abstract, the author should focus on the objectives and goals of the research, describe the results in detail, and provide a brief conclusion based on the results. The author may also combine different moves into one sentence to save space, use present tense to emphasize that the results are generalizable and applicable, and choose either active or passive voice, depending on their preference and the nature of the research.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the results-driven approach is a common type of research abstract in certain fields, such as engineering. It focuses on the objectives and results of the research and skips over the research background. When writing a results-driven abstract, the author should focus on the objectives and goals of the research, describe the results in detail, and provide a brief conclusion based on the results. The author may also combine different moves into one sentence to save space, use present tense to emphasize that the results are generalizable and applicable, and choose either active or passive voice, depending on their preference and the nature of the research.

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