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Sentence types

Watch this video on the four different types of sentences.
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We will now explore the four types of sentences. The first type is the simple sentence. These sentences only have one independent clause and do not have any conjunctions. The second type is the compound sentence. Which has two or more independent clauses that are joined using a conjunction. Conjunctions include 4 and but nor as because or yet, the third sentence type is the complex sentence and these have one independent clause and one or more dependent clauses. Finally, we have the compound complex sentence which has two or more independent clauses and one or more dependent clauses.
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Just as a reminder an independent clause is formed with a subject and a verb at minimum on the other hand a dependent clause may have a verb and an object. But what makes it dependent is that it does not have a subject. We will now look in more detail at each of the four types of sentences. So when we look at a simple sentence, we see it is only formed of one independent clause which as we just discussed is a subject and a verb if we take the example of Tim walked to the store. The subject is Tim and walked is the verb. Because the sentence only has one subject and does not have any conjunctions. It is simple.
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Next is the compound sentence which has two independent clauses. We know that an independent clause has a subject and a verb and we will use our simple sentence Tim walked to the store. And then add another independent sentence. He bought milk. In this second independent sentence the subject is he and the verb is bought. We will then combine these with a conjunction to get the compound sentence of Tim walked to the store and he bought milk. This is a compound sentence because it has two subjects Tim and he
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a complex sentence on the other hand only has one subject like the simple sentence, but the difference between the simple and complex sentence is that a complex sentence also has a dependent clause we know from earlier that a dependent clause can have a verb and an object but it does not have a subject. So then we will take out independent clause from earlier Tim walk to the store and add the dependent clause although forgot to buy bread. In this dependent clause the verb is forgot and the object is bread. Also note here that the verb is not to buy because it is added detail to the sentence although forgot bread.
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So then when we combine them we get Tim walked to the store although forgot to buy bread. If we were to add a subject into the sentence to have Tim walk to the store, although he forgot to buy bread. That would be a compound sentence because we’ve added the Heat. Last but not least we have the compound complex sentence. This is when we have two independent clauses that will be joined with a conjunction along with a dependent clause. So if we take the two independent clauses and the one dependent clause we have already written. We get a compound complex sentence that reads Tim walked to the store and he bought milk although forgot to buy bread.

Watch this video to understand the different sentence types. This knowledge is essential for properly understanding punctuation.

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