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The jazz standard “Someday My Prince Will Come” in voiced position

The jazz standard "Someday My Prince Will Come" in voiced position
9
Let’s have a look at voicings now for “Someday My Prince Will Come”. For B flat major 7 the first chord we can either start it there, or start it there - we’ve got our 2 positions. Let’s make a choice. Let’s start it on the third inversion. The second bar is D7. If we wanted to put in a sharpened fifth - a B flat - we could thicken up the chord. E flat major7 - the closest one is the 6/9. Again if we wanted to put in a sharp eleven we could put in the A natural. G7 with a sharpened fifth, C minor7, G7 with a sharpened fifth, C7, F7.
57.5
We’re now on bar 9, D minor7, D flat diminished - or D flat diminished7 if you want. You can take any of those, or you can take (for the) diminished - the other shape we have discussed. C minor7 - I don’t know where we are at - either C minor to F7 or C minor to F7.
89.1
Fourth line - C minor7 to F7. I’m just going to the fifth line now, the second time bar, F minor7, B flat7, E flat major7 and an inversion of E diminished - that’s the closest. You can take any of those obviously, but that’s the closest.
106.8
Then we’ve got this dominant pedalling: B flat major7, C minor7, F7, B flat major7. Actually on the Aebersold playalong they keep the dominant pedalling going all the way through the last 4 bars - so it’s all over F. One small thing which I didn’t say, when I play the second A I change the first 2 chords from B flat major7, D7 sharp5 to B7 flat5, E major7 sharp11. In other words instead of playing - I play. That second chord is just a semitone away, a semitone above E flat major7 sharp11. It adds more colour, more interest to the sequence. If the bass player goes with you, so much the better.
166.3
If the bass player plays the usual B flat, D, then you’ll get some tension, but the tension will release as is so typical of our tonal music.
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Learn Jazz Piano: III. Solo Piano and Advanced Topics

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