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Creating learning intentions based on students’ starting points

Interactions with students should be linked with the learning students are developing, rather than discussions being about what students are doing.
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DYLAN: For any activity it is important to think about the previous experiences and understanding students might have about that topic, but also the purpose and likely outcomes of the learning. For example if students are doing the marble chips and acid rates of reaction practical, they may be doing it to understand how to work out formulae, how to work out rate, also to develop their skills in using a burette. Therefore what is key to supporting students in their learning is to decide which learning intention you want to share and make explicit throughout the learning experience and through the interactions in the classroom.
In this video Dylan discusses when you are planning for learning not only the importance of identifying your students’ starting points, but also how you can make explicit the learning intentions students will be addressing. This idea links to the Hattie and Timperley question, ‘Where are we going?’
Dylan stresses that it is important that the experiences students engage with in the classroom and interactions that occur, are associated with the learning students are developing, rather than discussions being about what tasks students are doing.

Discuss

How and when do you share learning intentions?
You may all have different ways that you share learning intentions with your students. In the discussion below, post when and how you share learning intentions (learning outcomes) with your students. Include a justification why you use this approach.
In the next step we hear from our teachers about how they plan for learning with learning intentions. You will then watch how some of the teachers have shared their learning intentions with students.
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Planning for Learning: Formative Assessment

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