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Affinity Wall Notes From the Previous Lecture

Affinity Wall Notes From the Previous Lecture

The previous video included a demonstration of Affinity Walls. In case the affinity notes we use are difficult to read on your device, here are the notes below:

U2 “Sometimes I have to use a fork to get the toast out.”

U2 “There’s no breakfast like scrambled eggs and good toast.”

U3 -likes toast to be slightly crunchy, but not burnt.

U4 “It’s hard to get the perfect golden-brown color.”

U4 -bought bread that was too tall for the toaster.

U1 -has smaller pieces of bread that don’t pop out when toasting is done.

U2 – obs. Participant pressed lever up so that it was easier to take toast out.

U3 – obs. He flipped bread upside down to toast the end that wasn’t toasted.

U3 – obs. After it popped, the top part of the bread wasn’t toasted.

U3 “Someone put the setting on low, so I had to toast it twice to get it crunchy.”

U1 “Just this morning, I burnt myself grabbing the toast after it was done.”

U2 “I used to set it on max and push ‘cancel’ when I thought it was done.”

U2 – obs.

U2 kept looking into the toaster to see if bread was toasted.

U2 -burnt toast this morning because she left it in too long.

U2 -finds that the knob isn’t consistent about how long it toasts.

As you watch the demonstration, you will see how we determine clusters for these notes, add summary descriptions, and abstracted analysis labels (top level). When we finish manipulating the affinity wall, you will see we end up with the notes in the following clusters (be sure to watch the video to see how we determined these clusters):

Bread comes in different sizes, but toasted lever height is fixed.

Bread height can be too tall for the toaster.

U3 – obs. After it popped, the top part of the bread wasn’t toasted.

U4 -bought bread that was too tall for the toaster.

U3 – obs. He flipped bread upside down to toast the end that wasn’t toasted. Bread can be too small for the toaster

U1 -has smaller pieces of bread that don’t pop out when toasting is done.

U2 – obs. Participant pressed lever up so that it was easier to take toast out.

U2 “Sometimes I have to use a fork to get the toast out.” People love perfect toast, but heat control is not easy, and users have no easy feedback.

People really like good toast.

U4 “It’s hard to get the perfect golden-brown color.”

U3 -likes toast to be slightly crunchy, but not burnt.

U2 “There’s no breakfast like scrambled eggs and good toast.”

It’s not easy to know exactly when toast is ready, and knobs aren’t reliable

U2 – obs.

U2 kept looking into the toaster to see if bread was toasted.

U3 “Someone put the setting on low, so I had to toast it twice to get it crunchy.”

U2 -finds that the knob isn’t consistent about how long it toasts.

U2 “I used to set it on max and push ‘cancel’ when I thought it was done.”

U2 -burnt toast this morning because she left it in too long. U1 “Just this morning, I burnt myself grabbing the toast after it was done.”

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