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Classroom examples: making connections

The final selection of activities for gathering evidence of student learning presents approaches for making connections. Our examples come from secondary (aged 11-16 years), but the approaches can be applied …

Classroom examples: indicating confidence

This is the first of three videos showing examples of collecting evidence. As you watch each of the videos, consider the type of decision you could make about your students …

Classroom examples: ranking

In this second selection of activities for gathering evidence of student learning you’ll see examples using ranking approaches. Our examples come from both primary (aged 5-11 years) and secondary (aged …

Developing your approach to planning for learning

We’ve explained that planning for learning is about anticipating where the points are in the lesson for collecting evidence of understanding from your students and considering what actions you might …

Decision-driven data collection

In this video Dylan discusses that formative practice starts with identifying what decisions you will want to make in your teaching. Once you have chosen what decision you will focus …

Planning for learning with formative assessment

In order to be responsive, you need to plan formative assessment opportunities. Without formative assessment opportunities, you cannot gather evidence about your students to plan for their learning. If you …

How do you plan for learning?

How do you know where to start your lessons? What would happen if your class can’t progress? How do you plan for learning? Welcome to Planning for Learning, from the …

Summary: starting points for teaching

This week you have explore the importance of planning for formative opportunities. You’ve considered planning using misconceptions and sources of evidence of misconceptions. You’ve then explored the significance of sharing …

A learning environment to counter misconceptions

Below we provide an extract from an article discussing the importance of teaching to challenge students’ misconceptions. Although the article is written from the perspective of developing students’ ideas in …