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María Quintana

MQ

I love travelling, reading and photography. In this pandemic time I’m doing courses about literature, and writing. Future Learn is helping me to broaden my mind.

Location Spain

Achievements

Activity

  • Thank you! Yes, there are many cultivated persons in this course with brilliant minds. @FrancesAlbrecht It was a pleasure doing this MOOC with all of you. See you in another mooc :D

  • This was an excellent course thanks to the content and all your contributions to our comments. Thanks for taking the time to answer on every step of the course with so insightful and kind comments. ;) I enjoyed every step of the way.

  • Thank you! I really love the videos and your enthusiasm for the subject. Specially the botanic gardens video.@PhilippSchweighauser(Educator) I saw it several times, and the traveling to the library treasures. The interview with professor Hugues was didactic and funny two. Congratulations to all the Basel team who did possible this MOOC.

  • It was an amazing experience participating in this course @FelixOberholzer(Mentor) thank you for you kind comments. :)

  • María Quintana made a comment

    I enjoyed this course more than any other I did previously in this platform. Not only for the great content, but for the excellent professors and mentors. I learnt a lot from students too. I added beautiful words to my notebook from that comments.
    These are some of the words I learnt from all of you, but I could write a lot more. Thank you to all of you for...

  • María Quintana made a comment

    Gesine, thanks for your feedback. I didn’t understood well the assignment. I realised when I read others from students. Your comment helped me. :)

  • There are places in which some years ago still people used the old typewriters. Amazing,
    http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-10/08/c_138456029.htm

  • I have a version gifted from my sister, from 1990, leather hardcover with extraordinary illustrations by Gustave Doré, with bible paper and a glossary below the texts....

  • As Meret I have three different versions of Don Quixote, two of them are hardcover and the other one is paperback and from 2005 for the IV centenary.
    I inherited the bigger one copy of Don Quixote from my Uncle, it has red and gilt typography in the cover and a emblem with two eagles and frames. It has two sheets with the name of the book and his author in...

  • Thank you Francesco @FrancescoJannetta(Mentor) I will look for Robert Walser’s work. It’s a pity that so many artists couldn’t share their work, or like Vicent Van Gogh wasn’t recognised whilst they were alive.

  • Typewriters are amazing! And there is nothing compare to the sound of the keyboard @JLeech Tom Hanks is passionate about typewriters. He owns more than hundred. Even he wrote a book about it and he also created and App in which you can write with different typewriters, with their authentic sounds, typography and their original colours....

  • Remediation is the evolution of technology, isn’t it? I’m passionate about it. I’m a collector of family objects (typewriters, telephones, radios, cameras, books) and my own objects. I feel the history in those pieces. They captured the time inside themselves. Maybe I don’t know how to explain it, but I love visiting old markets and, old shops. That’s like...

  • That game sounds interesting. I tried games many years ago but I didn’t like them. But it could be good introducing new themes, art, history... in games for kids. They are really tempted by games, and most of them abandoned books in their teens.

  • That’s amazing !@SurajitBose your story with this book. You could write a short story with it. Thanks for sharing. :)

  • Ohhhh! That’s really amazing! @FrancescoJannetta(Mentor) it would be a pleasure to visit that restaurant. I will search the net to see pictures of the place.
    I agree with both of you, the Paratexts in old books create the best atmosphere for reading the book, and also give them certain status of importance. Economic editions don’t take care of that details...

  • I agree with you @JillHind it’s a mistake putting actors’ faces in the poster instead of designing a good element related to the story. When I went to see movies after reading the books I always felt disappointed. The actresses’ faces are a claim for us to see the movie, but sometimes it provokes the contrary effect, We don’t want to see whatever beautiful...

  • Yes, you are right @JaneSaunte books and old pictures mean family history.

  • I do the same as your friend. Try it, it’s amazing. @ChristianH

  • Yes, it is. @DerekBond I tried to cut the pages twice, but I couldn’t. Besides, I’m not good at handicrafts, so I decided not to do it. :)

  • That’s curious.@IgorMokin here I see it like you. I have my father’s books from school. It’s not something you can throw out easily. But not everyone thinks like us. I admire a good library, not for the status can bring, but for the precious elements it has. My aunt gave me some sheet music, and I look for them on the net and I found the same in the National...

  • I do the same thing as you Jim. Even, I smell the book, if it is new or old. I think this is part of the ritual of reading in paper. Even when I finish the book I hug it occasionally if it is extraordinary.

  • I love touching books, I treated them carefully, even I bought one untrimmed in a old market and I couldn’t cut its pages, I thought it would be destroying those pages. The materiality of a book is crucial to have a complete experience, a sensory experience. But sometimes the price of a good edition or the weight of the better editions make us not to buy the...

  • In the article there are a lot of points to think about. I use an ebook to read in English (is an advantage to look for words, without leaving the book) and Spanish. I usually download the books from my library, then I give them back, the same way as I do it with paper books.
    I try not to use any devices before going to bed, because it’s true they alter the...

  • I cut this comment because it was for the next step. Sorry

  • The best part sometimes it’s putting the phone in silence. You don’t need to worry about messages at all. :)

  • My fellow students talked about many disadvantages smart phones have, I agree with them. But for me it has some parts I like a lot. One of these things is the camera. Due to I love taking pictures, I use my phone as a camera every day, I use it also to edit them and to create albums. My phone is really helpful for my to take notes, not only for this course,...

  • @SurajitBose I listened that the information that companies collected even could modify elections. That part of lack of privacy is what I detest the most.

  • I agree with you. We look for many things, we keep those things in our phones and then we forget we did it.

  • Thank you Tom! This is a insightful interview. He shows his opinions in a direct way, without hiding anything. It’s the other way around now, when politics and artists... say one thing and then the contrary. How different people look like from now.!

  • I searched on the net and I found this in Cervantes virtual @HuguesMarchal an edition of 1800 of Delille's L'Homme des champs.
    Maybe someone wants to take a look. It looks beautiful.
    http://www.cervantesvirtual.com/descargaPdf/lhomme-des-champs-ou-les-georgiques-francaises/

  • Thank you! @HuguesMarchal I will take a look. :)

  • Thank you. It’s really interesting. @HuguesMarchal

  • Thank you! It’s being a really amazing course.@PhilippSchweighauser(Educator)

  • As we saw in previous weeks, close reading, historical contextualisation, hyper reading and distant reading bring all together light when a student deal with a literary study. So they are all necessary and useful tools to get the best results. But close reading and distant reading works for literature students and professors. The rest could be manage by...

  • That’s a beautiful quote @GiuseppePezzoni with and an interesting consideration.

  • That was an interesting and insightful and funny interview! It seems to me there’s a good atmosphere in Basel university. The professor explained clearly the concepts and advantages of distant reading an also how to mix this with close reading.
    I would like to know if there is a course like this “literature in the digital age” in French language. My sister...

  • Thank youuuu Jane! @JaneSaunte what an amazing book! With so beautiful drawings too! I love kingfisher. I will need the dictionary...
    it’s a great idea to take this book to the primary schools. I will share it with a friend who is an English teacher here in Spain. Maybe she heard of it.
    That’s why I love this FL courses. There are students like you that...

  • @MirjamBen-Mayor(baselstudent) thanks for your explanation it help me understand better professor Hugues. What I find intriguing is knowing why a certain movement ends, like scientific poetry went down with the death of one of his masters. Maybe this is something revealing, why other writers continue or not the same style, and why it varied since it was...

  • What an amazing books! Close reading could reveal aspects experts can’t and also patterns they don’t see. Then those 500 books were digitalised to study them? I suppose so. Because this study centre its attention in French scientific poetry in a specific space of time. The Euterpe project puts in value not only the relevance of science in combination with...

  • This is an interesting experiment. I tried with three Spanish words: amor (love), felicidad (happiness), amigo (friend). These are a really common words and a lot of English speakers know them. In the Spanish corpora the most common word used between 1936 to 2019 was amigo, then felicidad and the last amor. But in the English corpora the results were the...

  • Docuscope finds patterns people can’t see. Maybe it works like the grammar checker apps or programs. They analyse the text; orthography, sintaxis, redundancy, overused, plagiarism and many more. I use an app to correct my English texts. Although it’s not infalible, it helps to improve my writings. We’ll see it in the next steps how this tool helps.

  • I love technology @JaneSaunte but I can’t think of statistics and numbers when we talk about books and literature. It’s a reality google and other companies work with data, scanning and managing numbers for their marketing purposes.
    Maybe the numbers work, but nothing compares an enthusiastic student investigating and analysing the books for himself, finding...

  • Ngram seems an interesting tool for students. I tried it but I didn’t find anything useful. Maybe I did it wrong. I believe in peoples judgment, so I would say it’s not a bad thing students analysis by their own effort. Objectivity it’s never easy, unless we present only facts like policemen do it. Otherwise the student present an essay with his/her own...

  • Thank you Fathima! It’s great to know about you. @FathimaIfadhaMDeen I’m doing another course: literature in the digital age. Next week will be week five of the course, and there is another one. Then I will rest for a while. I don’t know What I’ll do next. I will tell you just in case you are free an interested to join. ;)
    Good luck with the new course.

  • In Ezra Pound’s poem we have the same ingredients as in quotation B and C. For one side the nature (petals/trees) on the other side the city (the crowd/the chaos, the buildings and the noise) of new urban life. The advance of industrialisation provoked the authors’ analysis of whether this new life is really an advance or it would suppose alienation.

  • Although this part of the course is being harder than the previous ones, I’m enjoying the videos and professor Schweighauser explanations. I’m not familiarise with these theories, but I understood the difference with the video. This time I won’t give an opinion, but I’ll try in the next steps. I’ll broaden my knowledge thanks to my fellow students comments too.

  • Really revealing this video. Images could be considered as truths, but we know they are not true in some cases. What it’s more images reflect the photographer point of view, because he/she chooses what subjects to include in the picture or what to leave out. That could look obvious, but it’s a portrait of the artist himself/herself. The picture talks about the...

  • Thanks for the link @FrancesAlbrecht it was like listening a robot. He consumed drugs? It reminds me an interview to a Salvador Dali in the seventies I saw on the TV. It’s not this, what I remembered but I find this weird interview.
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=kjRdpj-jlbk

  • I was really impressed by the the video. I felt the loneliness of the patients there, and also the fear. I haven’t read Pounds work, So I don’t know if he reflected so clearly his antisemitism, but the image of being locked up in a place like that for years would destroy an artists mind for sure.
    Years ago I visited Terezin, a nazis’ work camp in the Czech...

  • I understand the context is essential for comprehending an artist work, but I will wait to know more about this in the next steps to write my comments. It’s complicated to extract a solid point of view.

  • Although I know historical context is necessary and puts the work of an artist in relation to the contemporary era, artists and its connotations, it’s not the part I like the most. No only because we can realise they are not as humans as good as artists, but because sometimes those artists behave so cruel to their families that you can’t really appreciate...

  • María Quintana made a comment

    I would say social reading brings different perspectives in the reading and interpretation of the text. Other’s opinions can widen our thoughts. But Learning alone implies calm, time for ourselves out of the world and a self work. It’s our moment with ourselves. That can’t change.
    Although I participated in “Goodreads” the social site for readers, I never...

  • I would say the same as you.@Marion63K it’s a great work putting comments. To write them you have to do a previous analysis in your mind, put ideas in order and then write them. And in my case, sometimes looking in the dictionary to search the meaning of some words I’m not sure. I’m getting better with that, and I learn new words every day. From your comment I...

  • Thank you for the link. @JaneSaunte I knew Amazon was jealous of librarians lent books, but I didn’t know they managed the selling of the writers they work with in that way.
    In Spain we borrow books from libraries. They are national libraries all connected, and we can borrow a paper book from our local library or a digital book from the App ebiblio. I do...

  • Since I began to do FL courses I learnt a lot @JLeech also enjoyed learning comments from others and I have more interesting subjects to choose to enrol in different courses. I discovered that writing comments in this type of course broaden my knowledge not only in my English skills, but in every matter I got into. ;)

  • I downloaded the book, it’s free. And put it on my book app in my IPad, when I selected a paragraph, copied and pasted in telegram (the app for messaging) I saw an advice at the end of the paragraph.@JaneSaunte Maybe it’s something Apple does with every book you download in the app. I have to check with other books apps to see what happens.

  • Yes, that’s the best idea @FrancescoJannetta(Mentor) I had to do that with future learn courses. Although I wanted to read a lot of comments, I felt overwhelmed, and decided to read less than ten in every step. Otherwise I wouldn’t finish the course. :D

  • Thank you! @EduardoMórlan you are right. I appreciate your advice. :)

  • Yes! If You copy a paragraph from an ebook they advise you this book is protected by a copyright bla bla bla... @TeresaHolmes I only did it to send an interesting paragraph of Don Quixote to my sister. I won’t do it again.

  • Although I manage social media, I’m not particularly attracted to this social reading. I’m in a little writers club in the local library. We write short stories and share with the rest of the group once a month. It’s rewarding, first we did that in the library, now we do it online.
    Some of my fellows belong to a readers club too. I don’t do that because I’m...

  • I agree with you. It would be too demanding and exhausting. But interesting at the same time.

  • Sounds beautiful! @JohannaDrosopoulou

  • I agree with you. When I began to teach design, my students payed a lot of attention to me. I gave them books to look, we talked about everything in the classes... but my last students barely payed attention to what I was saying, the were totally absorbed by the net, or their mobile phones. When I took books to the class only two o three students wanted to...

  • That’s amazing.@FrancesAlbrecht your students are fortunate to have such an imaginative teacher.:D

  • Yes, sure. When I have the time. ;)@EduardoMórlan

  • Maybe we can discover here some other funny translations:D @JaneSaunte

  • Googling “pecking” I found as first result the definition of Cambridge dictionary: When a bird pecks, it bites, hits, or picks up something small with its beak.
    Pecking has different uses as we see here.
    It’s funny that in Spanish we translate the word as “picoteo”. And we use this word when we go to eat “tapas” that delicious pieces of food the restaurants...

  • Really interesting the link. Thank you! Sometimes I wonder why are we all in such a hurry! What matters is learning and enjoying with family and friends while we are here.

  • The amazing thing of reading comments is learning from others. I looked for the link you shared, and discovered the beautiful melody. I took my morning coffee listening to it and enjoying the sunlight from the kitchen window. Fantastic! ;)
    Thank you!
    I could copy and paste the link to listen this music again... (filming, trespassing... etc) broaden my...

  • When I was in high school (long time ago) we as students “trespassing”more than we do now. We photocopied books, and we copied texts from encyclopaedia to write our works for class. So that’s not new.
    Scanning and juxtaposing is commonly used nowadays. Juxtaposing is the famous multitasking work we can do when we manage our devices. What is more, the...

  • That’s amazing! I’ve never heard of this bookwheel.@JLeech when we look for books in the library, we also take a quick look over the covers, the titles, or the authors. Searching, scanning, juxtaposing (with two books)...

  • Definitely as my fellow students, I used the other strategies: juxtaposition, scanning, fragmenting, and trespassing (only for personal purposes, if I use it for other reasons I name the author, the piece of work, and the web page). That’s the same as mentioning somebody’s work in a bibliography, in an essay for example.
    I consult a photography blog, really...

  • I use Opera browser in my IPad @JLeech but you can use Split view. It’s a mode to use two Apps at the same time. ;)

  • I agree with both of you@SabrinaSamsa(BaselStudent) Sometimes I lose the info I was interested in for keeping all that multi tab search.;)