Peter Moizer

Peter Moizer

Professor Moizer has been the Dean of Leeds University Business School since 2008. He was a Council member of the ICAEW and is a strategic advisor to the Greater Manchester Pension Fund (€22 billion)

Location Leeds University Business School

Activity

  • Alice and Catherine, you make the good point that one has to plan for the unexpected, because life is not predictable. Flexibility is very important

  • Jason, you have a good grasp of the supermarket sector.

  • Khaled, you have to know about the product before you will think of buying it!

  • Joseph, it is an interesting exercise to compare the brand of the Unilever company with its brand names. I think its product brand names are probably more powerful.

  • Michelle and Catherine, you both make good points. Part of the answer to the relatively higher price of "free from" foods may be the lower volume of production and so they do not enjoy the economies of scale of very large food producers.

  • Ryanair is also known for flying people to places close to where they want to go and so to airports with cheaper landing charges

  • Jonathan and Viktor, Lidl has been successful in the UK because they found a gap in the market and set about occupying it.

  • Catherine, some good points.

  • Fermina, good points about Lidl. Tesco is probably an example of hubris

  • Maariyaah, your description of Inayah shows great analysis on your part

  • Hermal, Beiersdorf sounds a good example. Not one I know.

  • Fermina, you are right without these attributes a business will not succeed

  • Mark and Catherine, you both highlight the importance of having a good reputation. The challenge is how to create such a reputation.

  • Bruno, agreed but you have to offer something that the customer wants to purchase

  • Anastasia, you are right if your customers do not trust you, then you have a problem

  • Athansios, yes everyone should be on the same page

  • Agree, it is vital to know one's market

  • Yes Ayan, leadership is key.

  • Maariyaah, yes you need determination, but you also need a good idea for the business!

  • The last cohort were very positive about what they had learnt from the case studies

  • Maariyaah, we worked hard to get such a good group of people.

  • Yes Ben, the glossary should help as you suggest. Glad you want to come to Leeds to study Accounting and Finance

  • Good points Arian, hope the Leeds MBA is going well

  • It should give you a taste

  • hope you get something from the course

  • Muzafar, this is a good example of how a small shop can compete with a large supemarket. The key is differentiation and in your example, this comes from selling local produce.

  • Paul and Irina, getting cash from customers who have bought on credit is one of the biggest challenges. There is where repeat customers are so valuable, because it is reasonably good assumption that is a customer has paid on time before that they will do so again.

  • Ahmed, your small pottery company is an excellent example of the challenges facing a small business, which needs to get cash from custormers.

  • Cherise, your local fruit and veg store is a good example of daily decision making

  • Cherise, a good summary of the qualities of good financial information but I would add the concept of relevance, information has to be relevant to the decision in hand.

  • Nicole, a good quick SWOT analysis

  • Cherise, I am glad you are enjoying the course.

  • Flan, I agree that knowing the profitablility of a business is important, but the balance sheet does provide an idea of the state of the business at a point in time, particularly if the debts of the business are large relative to the assets.

  • Andy, both cash flow and cash cycle have their uses. Cash cycle is useful in understanding the time it takes for cash outflows on purchases etc to become cash inflows when customers pay.

  • Andy, I agree with your sentiment about knowing what you are doing rather than relying on accounting packages, but I would suggest that Excel is a good way to do the manual analysis.

  • Suzanne, one of the important lessons of budgeting is the need to budget for unexpected items, because something always turns up and it is rarely pleasant!

  • Samuel, I am glad that as a student you are learning to budget. This is one of life's great skills!

  • Now the UK's two main industries are the financial sector and tourism. This would have been hard to predict forty years ago.

  • Hannah, a good example of planning.

  • Michael, you are right to identify the speed of technological change as a big factor in the survival of a business. Those businesses that can adapt can flourish and those stuck in the old ways of doing things tend to go to the wall. It is not just finance departments that have seen their way of working change, although I can remember those old videos of...

  • Diana, certainly without the initial start up funds, a business cannot get going and the biggest cause of failure of new businesses is underestimating the amount of start up capital they will need.

  • Nkese, having an audit is how businesses convince shareholders that their money is safely invested in the business because the shareholders can have confidence in the financial data published in a company's annual report.

  • Rimman, a good summary of the finance function.

  • Patrick, there are lots of examples of companies which seemed to be permanent fixtures on the high street, which have disappeared. it is because of the fast changing nature of today's market place, particularly those markets which can be served by internet shopping.

  • Nuria, you are right to point out that shareholders can be put off a company if it appears to have too much debt. What often influences shareholders is the nature of the business of the company. If the company's sales are volatile, then less debt is better. If the company has a steady stream of income, such as a utility company selling electricity, gas or...

  • Rimman, you have grasped the essential fact that having a budget allows you to compare what actually happened with what you thought would happen. You can then decide what to do about the difference, if you need to do something.

  • Melissa, you make a good point that whilst it is good to be close to customers, so are your competitors and so you have to strike a balance.

  • Nkese, what you find if you look deeply into a business is that everyone is important. It is a bit like trying to decide which is the most important organ in your body. Is it the heart, lungs, brain etc. The simple answer is that they are all vital to life.

  • Lauren, I see budgeting as part of a planning process. You have to have some idea of what will be the consequences of doing something.

  • Mauricio, you make a good point about fashion items, where there is a need to be selling the latest designs. Getting the balance right in terms of how much new stock to hold is not easy.

  • Daniel, you raise a good point and it is often seen in bulk discounts. Do you save money overall by buying in bulk, if you have to spend money storing the stock?

  • Muzafar, you raise a good point about an individual shareholder's need for cash. One cannot always have the luxury of waiting to sell at the top of the market, assuming that one was sufficiently confident to when that was!

  • Mohan, I agree, sensitivity analysis is a good way to get some feel as to which elements of an investment appraisal are particularly important to get right.

  • Flan you make a good point about the commercial power of large corporations and their use of it. All that small companies can do is to name and shame the larger ones, but as you say they then risk being put on a black list.

  • Paul, it is true that there can be some non-voting shares, but there have to be some voting ones as well! Hence some group of shareholders has to take decisions. Non-voting shares are like any other product. To get someone to want to buy them, they have to offer something worth having at the right price.

  • One of the dangers of these more sophisticated investment appraisal methods is that people lose sight of the fact that they are based on forecasts of future cash flows and get seduced by the technique. A complex financial calculation is only as good as the data. Often a simple questioning approach is best.

  • Julanda, I really liked your summary of crowdfunding.

  • There is also a new dimension with crowdfunding and that is that the product or service has to have some wow factor that makes it stand out and draw in potential investors.

  • Vere, a good point. Bank managers need to feel that they can get their money back, either because the business looks profitable or because the business is offering some security for the loan (usually property), which can be called in if the company has trouble making its interest and loan repayments.

  • Alexandra, this is an excellent point. If you take out a loan, then surplus cash has to be generated to pay the interest and some of the capital. This is what happens when people take out a mortgage on a house. They need to make the mortgage payments otherwise they could have their house repossessed.

  • You have to distinguish between companies whose shares are traded on a stock exchange and for which there is therefore a market price that you can discover and those companies which are private and for whom the shares have no market price. For private companies, the share price is determined by a bargaining process between the issuer of the shares and the...

  • John, predicting which shares will enjoy big price rises and which will suffer large share price falls requires specific knowledge about the company that is not generally known. Most people prefer to own a portfolio of shares, so that they might own shares in 30 or more different companies. The hope is that more will go up than go down!