Marc Angelier

Marc Angelier

Fervent defender of braille, I travel the world to train practitioners and to make inclusive school for all a reality!
I am in charge of implementing LEGO Braille Bricks concept for the LEGO Foundation

Location France

Activity

  • @MartynBull You are right but we can use this activity as an inspiration when learning letters will be possible. But, you are right, one thing at a time!

  • Thank you @MehreenKanwal

  • We won't tell him @TanyaJobson but thanks for sharing! Sometimes, it works even better when the figurine is a famous character.

  • Great @TanyaJobson Nice proposal.

  • Actually @TanyaJobson those words are the same in English and French. But, it is a good option. to use LEGO Braille Bricks to work and learn a different language.

  • That's a great suggestion. Most activities in one section can be used to work on various cognitive skills.

  • Great lesson plan! Thank you @DawnMurtagh

  • Yes @TanyaJobson Warm up activities can be fun!

  • Yes @TanyaJobson You can use some of the activities proposed in the website and adapt them to learn punctuation.

  • Thank you @TanyaJobson

  • Thank you @KarinTrifinopoulos That's a real fun way to learn braille dots patterns.

  • Thanks @chloeBatchelor I am sure children love that!

  • Yes @AkeishaL that's a good possible variation for "Apple Trees"

  • Great @DawnMurtagh Thank you for sharing!

  • @MartynBull Thank you for sharing!

  • Muffin tins are great too!

  • @EllyKurniaAndangratri You are welcome! It is also a good activity to propose to the entire class in inclusion.

  • Yes @KathrynS that's a good idea. But, as we are still in a pre-braille category, children are not supposed to be able to read numbers on the bricks. But, that's a good option to transform this activity into a braille numeracy one.

  • Agree @EllyKurniaAndangratri A lot of mainstream teachers are using this activity when they start introducing braille to their blind students' friends. They love it!

  • Yes @MartynBull especially when children are discovering the bricks. Noah had no experience with them!

  • Yes @TanyaJobson it is definitely an inclusive tool.

  • I understand @TanyaJobson I have the same issue!

  • @YazminDelValle-Rodríguez That's a good idea for professionals but not that convenient for the children use: they have to explore many bags to fine the bricks they need.

  • Good idea @BrandeeShiska

  • @MartynBull Touching or not the child's hand is something you have to propose to the child. You can ask their opinion on that. They are often fine with it. But, it leads to another question: am I guiding the child to much?

  • Yes @YazminDelValle-Rodríguez it is very meaningful for the child.

  • Yes @BrandeeShiska your comment is a good example of what professionals must take into consideration: how to go further, what to do next...

  • Yes @PatriciaSherlock it. sometime help the child to better understand the activity before being able to imagine the brick can be anything.

  • Yes @MartynBull and good option to propose activities for children younger than 4.

  • Yes @YazminDelValle-Rodríguez and I would add: observe the child we are working with and propose adaptation, advice, guidance if needed.

  • @BrandeeShiska That's why professional mindset in so important: we have to adapt our method and propose the "best" adaptations anytime: where to start...

  • Thank you @MartynBull Your comment is a good example on how we can work on prerequisites. Your progression can be incorporated in a lesson plan which final activity could be "Save the Turtles".

  • Yes @TanyaJobson it is a good example of a meaningful activity helping the child to explore the bricks.

  • Yes @YazminDelValle-Rodríguez it is important to propose those. activities so the child get used to the bricks.

  • @TanyaJobson Nice definition of pre-braille!

  • Thank you @AkeishaL I like the fact you didn't mention age, as children may need to develop their pre-braille skills even at a later stage.

  • Yes @TanyaJobson That's why we have to find ways to make the activities meaningful for the child we are working with.

  • Dear @karolkijewski Your comment perfectly summarizes the elements a professional teaching visually impaired children have to consider.

  • Dear @DawnMurtagh Your comment is interesting because emotional skills are often forgotten when teaching or are least not considered as important.

  • Yes @karolkijewski all elements are equally important!

  • Hi @AkeishaL Glad you found them!

  • @BrunoDuarte Glad you mentioned social skills!

  • Thank you for sharing @AkeishaL That's usually what people remember most, when they learnt through play!

  • Welcome @JCWARRENNAPOLIS Do you plan to use LEGO Braille Bricks with the children you are working with?

  • Hi @DawnMurtagh Welcome to the course! Hope you will teach braille using LEGO Braille Bricks soon!

  • All live sessions are independent, so you are welcome to attend just one or them all!

  • Yes @GhofraneBelaidi That's crucial !

  • Yes, @LindaRees That's an option but turning the bricks can be difficult if they are in a grid and not turning them upside down can make the activity too easy for sighted peers.

  • Yes, @NasrinKadwa That's learning through play!

  • Thank you @KarinTrifinopoulos I really like this option ! I have translated it as it can be useful for others : "To help with this game, I would use an egg box to help orient where the bricks are. Alternatively, I have also made a system with 10 small boxes (or cans) glued together on a base. This box system can be used not only as a container for the bricks,...

  • Yes @LindaRees They are the first involved by inclusion.

  • Thank you! @NasrinKadwa I like your statement.

  • Yes @MehreenKanwal You are right. It only concerns letters for A to J representing numbers from 1 to 0

  • Thank you!

  • Yes, @MehreenKanwal that's why we always suggest to adapt lesson plans to the children we are teaching to.

  • Remember you can post photos of your arrangements on LEGO Braille Bricks Facebook Community!

  • Yes @NasrinKadwa Adapt the spacing between bricks can make the activity easier or more difficult.

  • @maryrussell Yes you are right. It is very difficult to clap and go back to the letter. That's why we suggest this activity as a possible variation. Have you been through the activity sheet to read the initial "Let's play"?

  • Yes and he was so proud!

  • That's so true! @maryrussell

  • Agree @NasrinKadwa Back up planning is fundamental.

  • Yes @HappinessMudau Lesson plans are crucial and at the heart of our jobs.

  • Great definition!

  • Thank you @PatriciaSherlock. I definitely like this idea of sharing with parents at home.

  • Exactly @EdmoreSibanda . In a holistic way.

  • Yes @PatriciaSherlock it is just informative.

  • @GhofraneBelaidi Social interactions benefit all students. They love to share their strategies and happiness when they have achieved their task.

  • Thank you @LisaBailey It is so important to refer to the child's experiences.

  • @MehreenKanwal Nice to read your adaptation for sighted children!

  • Hi! @NasrinKadwa can you explain more what do you mean by "widened colours height"?

  • Thank you for sharing your opinion about textures @maryrussell We could also imagine a classic brick with different textures on each face. It would be a great opportunity to work on this so important topic for a young child.

  • Thank you @PatriciaSherlock for your nice comment!

  • Thank you @HappinessMudau Stay tuned to LEGOBrailleBricks.com to check in which countries the bricks are available and remember, you can make your own braille bricks!

  • Yes @EdmoreSibanda and a lot of fun activities can also be imagined for older students in different topics: advanced math, chemistry, music, computing and much more.