Stuart Chell

Stuart Chell

Stuart is a fundraising consultant specialising in high-value giving (trusts, major donors and corporates) and faith based charities, and a current MA student at Kent University.

Location Wigan

Activity

  • @MegHenry We are really pleased this has helped :-)

  • @ElenaStartseva That is an excellent idea. The Supporter Journey Planning Worksheet is just a basic template so that it can work for most organisations. However, you absolutely should adapt it to make it as useful as possible for your organisation.

  • @BalaramNath That is great news!

  • Thanks @BalaramNath, we are glad it is helpful

  • @VartikaSingh It is so powerful. If anyone ever doubted the importance of thanking donors, they just need to watch that video.

  • Glad it was helpful @VartikaSingh

  • @VartikaSingh Absolutely. Your supporters love to hear how their gifts have made a difference, and it is the number one thing that will encourage them to give again in the future.

  • Welcome to the course @BalaramNath, hopefully it proves useful.

  • You ideas for Ghana sound fantastic. Welcome to the course @JenniferL, we hope it proves useful

  • Welcome @GeovannaAmbi, we hope the programme helps!

  • Hi @RescueInitiative, the only way to find out is by asking them. A good thing to do when a donor lapses is to call them, thank them for their support, and ask for their feedback. My experience is that asking them, "why did you stop giving" will cause them to clam up and you will get stock answers like, "change of financial circumstances". However, asking them...

  • @VartikaSingh These are great reflections from the training. Thank you for sharing.

  • @VartikaSingh Really glad it was helpful :-)

  • @AnnaB That is not an uncommon response to this exercise. We can often feel like we do not know anyone, but by doing this exercise we can see all our potential supporters in one place. Glad it has been helpful.

  • @RescueInitiative You are not alone here. I think the key is being comfortable in the knowledge that asking again is the right thing to do for a number of reasons: 1) asking again confirms to the donor that their gift made a difference and they are valuable to your organisation. If you don't ask again, they might assume that their donation was not...

  • @AnnaWright Hi Anna, it certainly will

  • Thanks @RoisinBrennan-O'Neill, this is a really good summary of the key points.

  • Thanks @RoisinBrennan-O'Neill, hope it proves useful.

  • Nice to meet you @RoisinBrennan-O'Neill. We cover fundraising plans later in the course, so hopefully this will be useful.

  • Welcome @LauraQuaiter, we hope you find it useful

  • @SusanScothern You raise some very topical points. If you are interested in this subject you might enjoy reading Rob Reich's Just Giving or Linsey McGoey's No Such Thing As A Free Gift.

  • @HannahWilliams That is brilliant that you are being transparent and thoughtful with your use of stock photos.

  • Yes @LisaRowell! These are great uses of trustees.

  • That sounds a good next step @LornaLee

  • Great you have a colleague like this @HannahWilliams, could you buddy up with them to develop an ethics policy?

  • Brilliant actions @LisaRowell. Maybe encourage some friends/family to mystery shop your charity and feedback how they found the experience.

  • Great reflection @LornaLee. Remember there are lots of third party providers such as Just Giving, Stripe, Enthuse, Goodbox etc who have lots of great "out of the box" solutions to make donating to your charity easier.

  • Glad it is helpful @LisaRowell

  • @HannahWilliams Very similar situation Hannah. If you are not an environmental charity, then you need to weigh up what is right for your beneficiaries against general environmental goals.

  • @RoisinBrennan-O'Neill It absolutely does

  • Great points @ElleniH. I totally agree that it is all too easy to get lost in a budget and forget to tell your story effectively.

  • @DavidPetri asking companies to volunteer or provide expertise is a brilliant way to engage them, and many will be open to this. It can also lead to further support down the line.

  • Welcome @ElizabethLeeke, I think this course will really help you develop your thoughts and strategy for diversifying income. If you have any questions or thoughts throughout the course, feel free to use the comments board.

  • Really good point @BobFrancis. Have you had any experience of this? An example might help others on the course.

  • Great point @ValEvans.

  • This is an interesting one @LindsayWhite. I would also suggest you also need to consider the amount each method also raises in making your decision. For example, if a paper thank you letter achieves better donor engagement and more funds raised that allows you do deliver more work, does the good work outweigh the environmental impact of letter? It is a really...

  • This is an interesting one @JoPage in light of the increasingly environmental concerns. However, if you are not specifically an environmental charity, you need to balance the benefit to the beneficiaries for using a 4x4 versus the environmental impact and decide what is the right decision in your case.

  • Thanks for sharing @ValEvans. There are times when charities need to decide whose needs they will prioritise - the beneficiaries or the donors? Then when questions arise about appeals that might make donors feel uncomfortable, but are the right thing to do for beneficiaries (e.g. it will raise them more money or tell their story), you can fall back on your...

  • @LindsayWhite it is definitely worth it, what you do not want to do is wait until an ethical issue arises to develop the policy, as that is difficult to navigate. However, I know it is a job that is hard to come around to amongst other more time sensitive work.

  • Hi @KarenCox, I know what you mean. I specialise in Christian fundraising and have seen that because of the faith element the ethical bar is raised meaning we have to be extra clear on our ethical policies and procedures.

  • Absolutely @KathrynWhite, unfortunately too often charities wait until a scenario arises before drawing their ethical boundaries, which then complicates things.

  • We are glad they are helpful @LouiseMiddleton

  • @HannahWilliams Glad they helped :-)

  • @DavidHassen Haha brilliant :-)

  • They are wonderful @GillianWoodrow and very easy to work with.

  • Really pleased it is helpful @DavidPetri

  • Hi @DavidHassen and welcome to the course. In week 2 we have a session on "fundraising for unpopular causes", which you might find useful for the political livestream. In the meantime, please feel free to ask questions in the comments.

  • Thanks for the feedback @HannahWilliams, glad it is helping.

  • That is fantastic @JoPage. As a fellow fundraiser, can I tell you how much we appreciate colleagues like yourself!

  • Hi @HannahWilliams these are wonderful reflections. We are really pleased you are getting so much out of the course. Regarding point 2, your nervousness about offending people, there are a couple of things I've picked up along my journey which might help. The first is that people on the whole don't mind being asked for donations as long as the ask is...

  • Hi @HannahWilliams I've responded to these now on Padlet. Let us know if anything does not make sense or you have any further questions.

  • Thanks @DeborahNevin for sharing this. I am sure it will be useful for many on the course.

  • Hi @ElyB, and thanks for joining us. It's great to hear you want to learn more about fundraising, we hope this course is of use.

  • Welcome @AminatAyodele - we really hope this course helps at the start of your exciting journey. Feel free to ask questions in the comments.

  • Hi @LornaLee, your comment about leaders "just do" really resonated with me, as I have worked with many youth charities over the years. One thing I've had success with is making story-telling a part of the culture, as a way to celebrate and focus all on the mission. For example, encouraging leaders to start meetings spending five minutes sharing stories about...

  • Absolutely @KarenCox, and the more people in your organisation that gets involved in fundraising (be it in the planning or delivery) the easier you will find it. Always good to engage colleagues in these discussions!

  • We are really pleased it has helped @KathrynWhite

  • That is great news @LouiseMiddleton

  • @KimberlyDijksman we have certainly seen corporates stepping up more in the pandemic and hopefully this will continue.

  • We are pleased it is helpful @IfeAlleyne. Feel free to use the comments to ask questions to the tutors.

  • @DavidPetri Glad it is helpful. Please feel free to ask any questions in the comments.

  • We hope you find it useful @DavidPetri

  • @LouiseMiddleton That's great news!

  • Great to hear @LouiseMiddleton you are thinking about the next steps. Have you started formulating a plan to do this?

  • @KarenCox great point! And remember stories will be everywhere in your charity. Fundraisers are a little bit like journalists. A training course I attended years ago encouraged us to keep a small pad at all times to capture those ad hoc stories you hear by the kettle or before a meeting, which can prove to be gems at a future date.

  • Hi @KathrynWhite, these are great reflections. Tone is difficult. I think the key is being very clear who the audience is for every communication. It is normally when we are creating "a one size fits all" communication that we tie ourselves up. And I definitely agree with an ask. Every communication should have a call to action. There is no point creating an...

  • Hi @KathrynWhite, what a wonderful brochure! I have put some thoughts on Padlet, hope they help.